FACULTY CALENDAR 2021-22

Graduate degree programs

For prospective students

Find out more about our graduate degree programs in the prospective students area.

Note: The general regulations listed in the Academic Rules and Regulations section of this Calendar apply to all graduate students registered in the Faculty of Dentistry.

Staff 2021-2022

Associate Dean, Graduate Education

E. Lam

 

Graduate Faculty

Agur, A.

Aubin, J.

Avivi-Arber, L.

Azarpazhooh, A.

Bozec, L.

Bressman, T.

Casas, M.J.

Casper, R.F.

Cvitkovitch, D.G.

Davies, J.E.

De Souza, G.M.

Dempster, L.

Deporter, D.A.

Dostrovsky, J

Finer, Y.

Ganss, B.

Glogauer, M.

Gong, S-G.

Grynpas, M.

Haas, D.

Hinz, B.

Kenny, D.J.

Kishen, A.

Lam, E.

Lawrence, H.P.

Lévesque, C.

Magalhaes, M.

Manolson, M.F.

McCulloch, C.A.G.

Moayedi, M.

Moriarty, T.

Peel, S.

Prakki, A.

Qui√Īonez, C.

Santerre, J.P.

Sessle, B.J.

Seth, A.

Sherman, P.

Simmons, C.

Sone, E.

Tenenbaum, H.C.

 

 

 

Associate Members (* for those with Restricted membership)

Albaghdadi, H.*

Andrews, P.

Arat, E.*

Barnett Foster, D.

Barrett, E.

Barzilay, I.

Basrani, B.

Blanas, N.*

Boutis, K.*

Bradley, G.

Caminiti, M.

Campbell, K.

Carmichael, R.

Carneiro, K.

Cherkas, P.

Chvartszaid, D.

Cioffi, I

Cuddy, K.*

Daskalogiannakis, J.

Demicco, E.*

Dickson, B.

Dosani, F.*

D’Souza, N.*

Fisher, D. *

Freeman, B.

Garisto, G.*

Goldberg, M.

Iakounine, A.

Iglar, K.*

Judd, P.L.

Katsikeris, N.

Kulkarni, G.

Lai, J.

Lança, A.J.*

Laporte, A.

Lee, L.*

Leong, I.

MacMillan, C.*

MacMillan, R.

Malkhassian, G.*

McComb, R.J.

Mendes, V.

Metaxas, A.

Moharir, M.*

 

Mock, D.

Nainar, H.

Nkansah, P.*

Ouanounou, A. *

Perez-Ordonez, B.*

Perschbacher, S.

Pharoah, M.J.

Posluns, J.*

Psutka, D.

Pilliar, R.M.

Romain, A.*

Sectakof, P. *

Selvaganapathy, R. *

Shrestha, A.

Shojaei, A. *

Shokati, B.*

Singhal, S.

 

Somogyi-Ganss, E.

Stevens, K.*

Suri, S.

Sutherland, S.

Tam, L.E.

Tenn-Lyn, N*

Weinreb, I.*

Wong, M.

Yarascavitch, C.

 

Emeriti Members

Dao, T.

El-Badrawy, W.

Ellen, R.P.

Fenton, A.

Liebgott, B.

Mayhall, J.T.

McComb, D.

Ross, R.B.

Sigal, M.J.

Titley, K.

Watson, P.A.

Zarb, G.A.

Tompson, B.D.

Wood, R.E.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Introduction

Research-Based Thesis Programs

The Faculty of Dentistry offers a graduate program leading to either a Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree. This graduate program appeals to:

1.  Applicants who have a degree in dentistry and who are pursuing research training and advanced clinical education leading to qualification in one of ten dental specialties; and

2.  Applicants, both dentists and non-dentists, who are pursuing graduate research training without advanced clinical education.

Consequently, both the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees have a common core of course work and consist of three options, with each having varying additional research and training requirements. The Faculty’s Funding Policy requires that all doctoral stream graduate students (M.Sc. and Ph.D. students who are not undertaking concurrent specialty training) receive base funding support from scholarships, awards and supervisor support equivalent to $17,000 plus doctoral stream tuition plus fees for a maximum of 2 years for M.Sc. students. Funding for Ph.D. students that have not yet successfully completed their Qualifying Examination is in the amount of $17,000 plus doctoral stream tuition plus fees and for Ph.D. students that have completed their Qualifying Examination, funding increases to $18,500 plus doctoral stream tuition plus fees. Funding for Ph.D. students is guaranteed for a maximum of 5 years.

Ph.D.

Students in the Ph.D. program involving research training will undertake customized advanced study and research requiring a minimum of four years full-time attendance. Minimum course requirements include the course DEN1100Y Doctoral Seminars in Oral Health Sciences, Research Ethics (DEN1010H), plus an additional 2.5 full course equivalents (FCE) that includes the course DEN1015H Introduction to Biostatistics; submission of a thesis, which constitutes a distinct contribution to knowledge in the field. After 12 months and within 24 months of starting a Ph.D. program, candidates will be expected to pass a qualifying oral examination to demonstrate an adequate capacity for dental research through previous work and a thesis proposal.

M.Sc.

The program will ordinarily require one year of full-time registration; however, it is the Faculty’s expectation that students will normally remain in full-time attendance on campus to enable full participation in departmental activities for two years. The first year of the program will include development of a research project and proposal, and course work, while the second year will be devoted largely to research and thesis completion and defense. Course work will normally include, as a minimum, fulfillment of the requirements for the course, DEN1001Y Master’s Seminars in Oral

Health Sciences, Research Ethics (DEN1010H) and successful completion of an additional 1.5 course equivalents (FCE) that includes the course Introduction to Biostatistics (DEN1015H). Permission for part-time studies may be given if the proposed research is determined to be of a nature that can best be accommodated by part-time studies. No funding is provided for part-time students. Information on Ph.D. and M.Sc. doctoral-stream programs and regulations are found in the Calendar of the School of Graduate Studies.


Flexible-time Program

The Department offers a flexible-time Ph.D. program for selected students whose career goal is a full- time academic position in a clinical specialty. Candidates concurrently establish their teaching and academic credentials. The major goal upon program completion is to enable candidates to compete for university tenure-stream professorial positions in their clinical science specialty. Students in this program will be guaranteed funding at the Faculty’s minimum doctoral stream level for years one to four of this program.

The program, which is dedicated to research experience, does not involve clinical training other than clinical research methodology, and entails completion of the research and course work requirements for the Ph.D. degree half-time, while teaching in a clinical specialty half-time.

Applicants must meet all School of Graduate Studies and Graduate Department of Dentistry admission requirements for entry to the Ph.D. program. In addition, applicants must have attained a professional degree equivalent to the University of Toronto D.D.S. and a graduate degree equivalent to the University of Toronto M.Sc. Preference is given to:

  1. applicants who have completed specialty education equivalent to the standard required for licensure as a specialist by the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario and
  2. applicants who hold a University appointment in Canada at an academic standard equivalent to the University of Toronto Lecturer.

Appropriate research supervision and advisory committee membership, customized plan of study, and timetable for the completion of the degree requirements, as approved by the Associate Dean of Graduate Education, will be in place at program commencement.

The Chair and Coordinator of Graduate Studies monitor progress by review of completed advisory committee reports based on annual meetings of the student with the supervisory

committee. Candidates will normally be expected to pass a qualifying oral examination to demonstrate an adequate capacity for dental research through previous work and a thesis proposal. Although the minimum residency requirement for the Ph.D. is one year, the anticipated completion date for the flexible-time Ph.D. program will be within five to six years from the registration date. The maximum time for completion will normally be eight years. Candidates are required to:

  1. complete minimum course work requirements (to include DEN1100Y Doctoral Seminars in Oral Health Sciences, Research Ethics (DEN1010H) plus an additional 2.5 full course equivalents (FCE) that includes the course Introduction to Biostatistics (DEN1015H);
  2. 2. after 12 months and within 24 months of starting the flex-time program successfully complete the qualifying oral examination to demonstrate an adequate capacity for dental research through previous work and a thesis proposal.
  3. 3. participate in all graduate research activities of the advisor’s research group;
  4. 4. conduct research leading to completion of the thesis;
  5. 5. present at meetings and publish original research findings in timely fashion; and
  6. 6. participate as members of departmental and student committees as applicable.

Research-based programs including specialty training

M.Sc. ‚Äď Thesis option is offered for dental graduates seeking advanced training in a clinical specialty as well as training in research. The program requires two to four years of full time registration, depending upon the clinical specialty, and involves completion of an original research project culminating in an oral defense of a written thesis, and completion of clinical and didactic coursework requirements as necessary to meet requirements for the degree that includes successful completion of the courses DEN1014H Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Care; DEN1015H Introduction to Biostatistics; Research Ethics (DEN1010H) and DEN1001Y Master‚Äôs Seminars in Oral Health Sciences. ¬†Upon completion of all program requirements students are eligible for the graduate degree, and for Specialty, Fellowship, or Board Certification in the chosen dental specialty.

M.Sc. ‚Äď Coursework only option is offered for dental graduates seeking advanced training in a clinical specialty in which additional coursework is undertaken as an alternative to a thesis. It is offered at the discretion of the Graduate Specialty Program Director. Admission, to the M.Sc. (Dental Public Health) coursework only option, may be granted to dental hygienists with a 4 yr B.Sc. degree with dental hygiene credentials.

This program requires two to four years of full time registration, depending upon the clinical specialty, entails completion of all clinical and didactic coursework necessary for the chosen specialty that includes successful completion of the courses Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Care (DEN1014H); Introduction to Biostatistics (DEN1015H); Research Ethics (DEN1010H) and Master’s Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y) along with three half-courses (1.5 FCE) in clinical, epidemiological, or basic science research methodology appropriate for clinical or public health practice. In addition, preparation; completion; and oral defense of a one-half course weighted Research Practicum (DEN1061H). Upon completion of all program requirements students are eligible for the graduate degree. Graduands with the exception of dental hygienists, are eligible for Specialty, Fellowship, or Board Certification in the chosen dental specialty.

Program transfer ‚Äď M.Sc. to Ph.D.

M.Sc. students pursuing either of the M.Sc. doctoral-stream, and the M.Sc. specialty-thesis option, who are demonstrating excellent progress in all facets of their program, may apply to transfer from the M.Sc. to the Ph.D. degree. Transfer examination timeframes vary according to the M.Sc. option being pursued, usually between 12 to 24 months from program commencement.

Ph.D. Specialty thesis option is offered for exceptional dental graduates seeking advanced training in a clinical specialty as well as training in research at the Ph.D. level. The purpose of this program is to train clinician/scientists who aspire to teaching and research careers in oral health sciences. The program involves completion of an original research project culminating in an oral defense of a written thesis, completion of the course Doctoral Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1100Y), plus an additional 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE) pertaining to the research component of the program, together with completion of clinical and didactic course work requirements as necessary for the chosen clinical specialty that includes successful completion of the courses Clinical Epidemiology and

Evidence-Based Care (DEN1014H), Research Ethics (DEN1010H) and Introduction to Biostatistics (DEN1015H). After 12 months and within 24 months of starting a Ph.D. program, candidates will be expected to pass a qualifying oral examination to demonstrate an adequate capacity for dental research through previous work and a thesis proposal.

These programs meet CDA educational accreditation guidelines for eligibility for Specialty, Fellowship or Board Certification in the dental specialties listed below. This applies to registrants in all specialty programs with the exception of Dental Hygienists registered in the M.Sc. (Dental Public Health) Coursework only option:

Dental Anaesthesia Dental Public Health Endodontics

Oral Pathology & Oral Medicine

Oral Pathology Oral Medicine Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Orthodontics

Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery

Pediatric Dentistry Periodontology Prosthodontics

All programs are a minimum of three years, except Dental Public Health, (2 years) Oral Pathology &

Oral Medicine, and Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery (4 years). The M.Sc. Specialty program has a prescribed timetable, whereas the Ph.D. Specialty thesis option is individualized.

It should be noted that the University of Toronto degree does not in itself confer the right of certification as a specialist. In Ontario, this is the prerogative of the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario, to which all questions regarding certification should be addressed (see Section of this¬†Calendar entitled ‚ÄúLicense for Dental Practice‚ÄĚ).

Students (with the exception of Dental Hygienists) enrolled in a clinical specialty program must not only meet the minimum requirements set out above, but in addition, in an extended residency period, must meet the requirements demanded for specialty certification.

Statement of good academic standing

A student is considered to be in ‚Äúgood academic standing‚ÄĚ when they maintain the requirements of minimum grade performance in coursework (B-) and meet at least once per academic year (July 1 to June 30) with their Advisory Committee and have submitted an Advisory Committee Report to the Student Services Office for review by the Associate Dean for Graduate Education following such a meeting. Failure to maintain good academic standing may result in various sanctions, including ineligibility for financial assistance, lowest priority for bursaries and assistantships, and even termination.

A student who encounters difficulties arranging a meeting of this Committee should consult the Student Services Office in advance of the relevant deadline for doing so. A student who, through his or her own neglect, fails to meet with their Advisory Committee in a given academic year will be considered to have received an unsatisfactory progress report from the Committee. In each of two consecutive Advisory Committee meetings, if a student's Advisory Committee reports that the student's progress is unsatisfactory, the Associate Dean for Graduate Education in consultation with the supervisor may recommend to the School of Graduate Studies the termination of registration and eligibility of that student.

Admission

Candidates will be accepted under the general regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Eligible applicants must have either a dental degree or a 4-year Bachelor’s degree with a B+ or 3.30 GPA (MSc program) or a A- or 3.70 GPA (PhD program) standing in the final year, or possess equivalent qualifications. Applicants to one of the specialty training programs must have a B+ or 3.30 GPA in the final year of their dental degree.

The selection of applicants will be subject to availability of supervision, funding and facilities, and to the applicant’s suitability for the program sought.

Application Deadlines for M.Sc./Ph.D. Specialist Dental Training programs:

To apply for our specialty programs

See Graduate studies with clinical training (become a specialist dentist) in our prospective students area.

June 1 (year preceding admission) Endodontics; Periodontology; Prosthodontics

August 1 (year preceding admission) Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

September 1 (year preceding admission) Dental Anaesthesia; Oral Pathology; Oral Medicine; Oral Pathology & Oral Medicine; Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology; Orthodontics; Pediatric Dentistry

January 15 (year of admission) Dental Public Health (first application deadline)

Only under exceptional circumstances will applications received after the closing dates be considered.

 

Enrolment to these programs is limited and is normally as follows:

Dental Anaesthesia -- 2

Dental Public Health -- 5

Endodontics -- 3

Oral Pathology/Oral Medicine/Oral Pathology & Oral Medicine -- 1

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology -- 2

Orthodontics -- 4

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery -- 3*

Pediatric Dentistry -- 4

Periodontology -- 3

Prosthodontics -- 2

*Annual enrolment is 2 Ministry of Health (MOH) funded students and 1 International Non MOH funded student with full Government/ Home University financial support.

Applicants who have been accepted to these programs are required, immediately on acceptance, to pay a $2,000 deposit, which will be credited against their fees upon registration.

 

Facility in English

As English is the primary language of instruction and communication at the University of Toronto, applicants must demonstrate an adequate level of proficiency in English, regardless of their citizenship status or country of origin. Applicants from universities outside Canada where English is not the primary language of instruction must provide results of an English language proficiency examination as part of their application. Tests must have been taken within the last 2 years at the time of submission of their application. Acceptable proof of English facility must be submitted by the application deadline. Official test scores must be sent by the testing agency directly to the University of Toronto. Our institution code is 0982. The following tests are recognized:

  1. Test of English as a Foreign (TOEFL): The Minimum requirement is TOEFL PBT - total          score 580 + 5.0 on TWE and for TOEFL IBT - total score 93 + 22 on Writing/Speaking.
  2. Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB): The minimum requirement is an                 overall score of 85.
  3. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic Module: The minimum requirement is an overall band of 7.0, with no band below 6.5.
  4. The Certificate of Proficiency in English (COPE): The minimum requirement is an overall score of 76, with 32 in Writing and 22 in each of the Reading and Listening sections.
  5. Academic Preparation ESL, School of Continuing Studies, University of Toronto: The          minimum requirement is a grade of 'B' at the 60/Advanced level.

Note: We will not exempt from English facility testing any applicant who studied in English in a country where the primary language is not English.

The Faculty will exempt from English Facility testing for any student who has completed a degree at a recognized university in one of the following countries: Australia, Barbados, Botswana, Ghana, Guyana, Hong Kong, Ireland, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Malta, Nambia, New Zealand, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, United Kingdom, United States of America, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

How to apply

To apply for our specialty programs see Graduate studies with clinical training (become a specialist dentist) in our prospective students area.

To apply to the graduate program with Dental Specialty training applicants must complete the online application form from the School of Graduate Studies website at: https://apply.sgs.utoronto.ca/. 

In addition to the online application form the following documents must be received by the Admissions Office by the application deadline:

  • Non-refundable application service fee of $ 285.00 CDN payable to the University of Toronto. ¬†¬†¬†¬† Payment may be made by credit card, certified check, or money order. We do not accept ¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† personal checks or cash.
  • A statement outlining your interest in the program. Include information on your background, ¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† interest, aptitude and ability for the Specialty Program. If available include information on the ¬† research project you wish to pursue.
  • A ¬†Curriculum Vitae or Resume.
  • Official transcripts of your academic record from each university attended are required for ¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† admission. Applicants who attended universities outside North America must provide notarized ¬†¬† English translations to accompany all foreign documentation not written in English. It is the ¬†¬† applicant's responsibility to arrange for transcript(s) to be sent directly from their institution to ¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† the Admissions Office. Academic records must be enclosed in an envelope provided by the ¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† institution(s) concerned and sealed or signed across the back of the envelope. Do not open. ¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† University of Toronto students applying to the dentistry program do not need to send in their ¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† official University of Toronto transcripts. We will download them from ROSI.

If academic records are interim pending completion of studies in progress, official final academic             records indicating that the degree has been conferred must be submitted to the Admissions Office            as soon as possible and before admission can be finalized. The School of Graduate Studies              includes instructions about clearing these conditions on the Offer of Admission.

  • At least TWO supporting letters of reference are required. If referees are submitting hard copies ¬†¬† of ¬†¬†their reference letters, ask your referees to enclose the letter (there is no departmental form to be completed) of reference in a sealed envelope with a signature across the seal.
  • Proof of English facility (if applicable) sent directly by the testing agency to the University of Toronto.
  • For international students proof of sufficient funding for the duration of the intended program of study is required. Documentation is to be prepared and submitted by your financial institution or financial sponsor.

Applicants to the M.Sc. or Ph.D. degree programs with specialty training in Dental Anaesthesia are required to register with the Postgraduate Dental Matching Program.


The online application allows applicants to manage and submit all the required admissions documents listed above. All documents may be submitted together with your online application electronically, or hard copies can be submitted directly to the Admissions Office at:

Admissions Office
Faculty of Dentistry
124 Edward Street, Room 104
Toronto, ON M5G1G6
Canada

NOTE: Hard Copies of all transcripts together with all transcript keys from all post-secondary institutions attended must be submitted in sealed envelopes from the issuing institution(s) directly to the Admissions Office at the Faculty of Dentistry before the application deadline even if you upload an electronic copy of your transcript to your online application.

Selection and notification of applicants

The selection of applicants is made by the Graduate Admission Committee from each corresponding dental department. Shortlisted applicants will be invited for an interview based on their potential as shown by all their application documents. Those not invited for an interview will be informed as well. Interview notifications are sent out as follows:

  • Late¬†August for programs in Endodontics, Periodontology and Prosthodontics.¬†
  • Late November for all other programs.
  • Late April for the program in Dental Public Health.¬†

A $2000.00 (CDN) deposit will be required from each applicant granted admission. It will be applied to the fees providing he/she registers.

Registration and requirements

Students must register at the School of Graduate Studies at the times prescribed by the School and must also register at the Faculty of Dentistry. Students attending during the May-August period will be required to complete their registration at the time the program starts. Students whose programs are incomplete at September 28 of the final program year are required to re- register and pay per term fees in September, at the beginning of a new academic year.

Graduate student certificate (License)

Candidates enrolled in a clinical specialty program must hold a General Certificate (License) or obtain a Graduate Students Certificate (License) from the RCDSO. Candidates must maintain current RCDSO certification for the duration of the program of study and bear all associated costs.


Clinics associated with the Faculty

Due to liability issues, students working in a Faculty clinic must be supervised by a Faculty member at all times whenever they are treating patients and all work must be done within normal clinic hours. Students who disregard this regulation will be subject to suspension from the clinics.

Applicants with a communicable disease

All Faculty of Dentistry students are expected to be in a state of health such that they may participate in the academic program, including patient care, without posing a risk to themselves or to others. Students with a communicable disease may pursue their studies only as long as their continued involvement does not pose a health or safety hazard to themselves or others. Such a health or safety hazard, if protracted, may preclude them from participation in clinical work essential to the satisfactory completion of their program of study. The health status of all students shall remain confidential. Registration status for HBV Carriers remains CONDITIONAL until the Expert Panel on Infectious Diseases reviews their case.

CPR

All graduate students examining patients and/or rendering clinical treatment to them are required to show certification in CPR before they may register in the first year of their program. Annual certification in the CPR course is required before students will be permitted to register in subsequent years of their program. Overseas students who have difficulty satisfying the regulations in their first year of registration should consult with the Associate Dean of Graduate Education.

Attendance

All graduate programs are full-time unless specified otherwise and full-time attendance is required. Students may be employed outside the University only with the written permission of the supervisor and/or Graduate Specialty Program Director. Employment must be limited to a maximum of 10 hours per week in any term.

Vacation policy

Graduate students are permitted to take up to 2 weeks’ vacation time per academic year, in addition to the Winter Break, Reading Week and statutory holidays. In exceptional circumstances, additional time may be granted.  Students must request the permission of their supervisor and/or Graduate Specialty Program Director in advance.

Health protection requirements

The general regulations regarding health protection apply to graduate and postgraduate students. See General Regulations in Section 8.

University of Toronto Policy on Official Correspondence with Students

The University and its divisions may use the postal mail system and/or electronic message services (e.g., electronic mail and other computer-based on-line correspondence systems) as mechanisms for delivering official correspondence to students. Students are responsible for maintaining and advising the University, on the University’s student information system (currently ROSI), of a current and valid postal address as well as the address for a University-issued electronic mail account that meets a standard of service set by the Vice-President and Provost. Students are expected to monitor and retrieve their mail, including electronic messaging account(s) issued to them by the University, on a frequent and consistent basis. Students have the responsibility to recognize that certain communications may be time-critical. Students have the right to forward their University-issued electronic mail account to another electronic mail service provider but remain responsible for ensuring that all University electronic message communication sent to the official University-issued account is received and read.

Grading

SGS and Faculty of Dentistry Postgraduate Dental Education approved courses are graded as follows:

Letter               Numerical Grade

Grade         Scale Marks          Definition

 

A+                   90 - 100%               Excellent

A                      85 - 89%                   Excellent

A-                     80 - 84%                   Excellent

B+

77 - 79%

Good

B-

70 - 72%

Good

FZ

0 - 69%

Inadequate

 

Effective 2003-04, the SGS grading scale applies to all SGS and non-SGS courses undertaken. Failure to obtain a B- in any course in any M.Sc./Ph.D. program, may lead to termination of registration. Should a student be permitted to continue, he or she must repeat the relevant course, or an alternate course recommended by the Graduate Department of Dentistry and the School of Graduate Studies, and obtain a satisfactory grade. The FZ, as well as the report for the completed or alternate course will appear on the student’s academic record.

Graduate courses offered by the Faculty to meet degree requirements

DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y Seminars in Oral Health Sciences

(CR/NCR)

 

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences is required as part of the program for all M.Sc. and Ph.D. students at the Faculty of Dentistry. The course is designed to demonstrate research progress, develop, and enhance presentation skills to a large audience, field questions and chair a seminar session. As part of this program, students must also meet individually with an instructor from the University of Toronto Health Sciences Writing Centre, one to two weeks before their seminar to receive expert advice on presentation skills and the design of their presentation.
Requirements:

During the course of their program, M.Sc. students are required

- To presents one 20-minute seminar during the final year of their research.

- To submit online in Quercus a 250-words (max) abstract for their seminar at least a week ahead of their presentation to be circulated.

- To present one poster at the Faculty of Dentistry Research Day

- To complete an anonymized peer-evaluation to be submitted online in Quercus after each session attended

- To chair one session.

During the course of their program, Ph.D. students are required

- To present at the 3-minute thesis event during their 1st, 2nd year and 3rd year.

- To presents two 20-minute seminar.

- To present two posters at the Faculty of Dentistry Research Day

- To submit online in Quercus a 250-words (max) abstract for their seminar at least a week ahead of their presentation to be circulated.

- To complete an anonymized peer-evaluation to be submitted online in Quercus after each session attended

- To chair two sessions.

Note that the first seminar and poster are to be presented in the year of their transfer or qualifying examination, and the second seminar and poster are to be presented during the year of their thesis defense. 

The presenting student supervisors are expected to attend the student seminar.

Attendance:

For the students who are not undertaking concurrent clinical specialty training:

    • MSc students are required to attend a minimum of 20 sessions until the successful defense of their thesis.
    • PhD students are required to attend a minimum of 70 sessions until the successful defense of their thesis.
  • For students who are undertaking concurrent clinical specialty training:
    • MSc students are required to attend a minimum of 20 sessions throughout their specialty training period.
    • PhD students are required to attend a minimum of 70 sessions throughout their specialty training period.

Please note, the average number of seminars per year is 26.

 

Feedback:

All students presenting will be offered feedback on their performance by Faculty members present during the session, either directly at the end of the session or by email. 

All students attending the session will be asked to complete an anonymized peer-evaluation form immediately at the end of each session. This will be done directly by submitting the completed template in Quercus. An anonymized summary of the peer-evaluation can be requested by the presenters.

 

Evaluation:

Proof of attendance of student attending the session will be performed using TopHat. Each student must enroll in TopHat as attendance can be taken at any time during the session or multiple times if necessary.

The evaluation of the course requirements will be based on the submission of peer-evaluation forms, submission of the abstract(s), and the confirmation of the poster presentation(s) at the Faculty of Dentistry Research Day and finally the chairing of sessions(s)

A grade of credit is assigned on satisfactory completion of all requirements. M.Sc. students register in DEN1001Y and Ph.D. student register in DEN1100Y

Note that the 3-minute thesis participation is not included in the evaluation.

 

 

L. BOZEC

 


DEN1010F Research Ethics

 

This course aims to highlight ethical values and regulations in different topics that are research-related: scientific writing, confidentiality agreements, students mentoring, research with humans, animals and biological samples, etc. The course involves participation in a seminar and the fulfillment of an online course offered by the Tri-council Funding Agencies of Canada. The same seminar will be offered in two different dates and attendance in one of the sessions is mandatory. Additionally, proof of completion of the online tutorial course ‚ÄúTri-Council Policy Statement 2 ‚Äď Tutorial Course on Research Ethics‚ÄĚ is required. This is a credit, non-credit course.

 

 D. CVITKOVITCH

 

DEN1014S Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Care

 

Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Care is a core course in the Faculty of Dentistry.  Successful completion of this course is one of the program requirements for the dental graduates seeking advanced training in a clinical specialty. This course will demonstrate the scientific basis for clinical decision-making in prognosis, causation, diagnosis and therapy following the principles of evidence- based health care. Examples from the dental literature are used to illustrate the concepts and their practical application.  The specific objectives of the course are:  1) to introduce principles of epidemiology as applied to clinical research; 2) to provide Clinical Specialty Graduate students with the fundamental scientific skills in clinical epidemiology to enable them to practice evidence-based dental care; 3) to provide the students with skills in answering questions using biomedical literature; 4) to provide students with the skills needed to critically appraise a biomedical research article.

 

A.  AZARPAZHOOH, STAFF
 

DEN1015F Introduction to Biostatistics

 

The Introduction to Biostatistics course is designed to provide graduate dental students with an understanding of the statistical methods necessary for data analysis and literature interpretation. The course covers: the summary of quantitative and qualitative data; normal curve principles; the t-test, one-way, factorial and repeated-measures analysis of variance; chi-square tests and other non- parametric methods; simple regression and correlation; multiple regression and ANCOVA.  Special topics, such as examiner agreement and sample size estimation, are also included.  In addition, the course offers an introduction to logistic regression and survival analysis. The course includes both lecture and computer lab sessions. Students are taught to create and manipulate dental datasets and conduct statistical analysis of data using commonly available computer applications (e.g.,SPSS).  References from the dental literature are used extensively during the course and material covered in lectures and labs is tailored whenever possible to the particular needs of the students’ research projects.

 

H.P. LAWRENCE
 

DEN1022F Investigating Pathogenic Biofilms

This graduate course focuses on fundamental biology of microbial biofilms and how biofilm ecology impacts on the pathogenesis of infections. The course draws knowledge of microbiology, microbial genetics, and functional genomics. The course consists principally in the reading of assigned materials and reading quizzes. It is intended as a core course for graduate students whose specialty areas deal with biofilm-related diseases and for doctoral stream students from diverse SGS departments, whose research centers on bacterial adhesion, bacterial physiology, and bacterial genetics.

 

C.M. LEVESQUE, STAFF

 

DEN1060F Oral Physiology: Sensory and Neuromuscular Functions

 

This is a lecture- and seminar- based course held for graduate and postgraduate students in the first-term of the academic year (2 hours per week).  Attendees will gain an in-depth understanding of the current knowledge in the field of orofacial sensory and motor functions, and critical reading and summary of articles in this field as well as experience in preparing and delivering critiqued seminars. The following topics will be covered: a review of structural and functional neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, neurogenetics, psychophysics, and behavioral studies relevant to the orofacial region, garnered using rodent and human models, as related to the sensations of touch, temperature, taste and pain in the orofacial region. The course will also review unique peripheral and central neurophysiological mechanisms of somatosensory functions involving orofacial skin, mucosa, periodontium, tooth pulp, periosteum, tendons, muscles, temporomandibular joints, salivary glands, and taste buds. Also covered are motor aspects of the neurophysiology of the orofacial region, including muscle physiology and its relationship to reflex and voluntary orofacial motor activity manifesting as mastication, swallowing, facial expression, speech and sleep; as well as basic and clinical pathophysiological correlates of the above functions.     


L. AVIVI-ARBER, STAFF

 

DEN1070S Advances in Dental Materials Science

 

A lecture and seminar course with assigned reading which will review the developments occurring in the field of biomaterials, as they relate to clinical dentistry. The course material is presented in three modules; 1. Material Structure and Technologies, reviewing metals, polymeric, and ceramic biomaterials; 2. Biomaterial-Biological Interfaces, reviewing advances in the study of Material/Biological Interfaces as they relate to protein, enzyme and cell interactions with biomaterials, as well as investigations examining the physical and chemical interactions of biomaterials with whole tissues; and 3. Bacteria-Biomaterials and Host Interactions, including clinical applications and associated biomaterial issues (including material testing, failures and drug delivery) in all the dental specialties. 4. Elements of Tissue Engineering, reviewing gingival tissue engineering, growth factors for tissue regeneration, and clinical application of bone engineering. Students will be assessed throughout the term based on three criteria; (a) ability to identify clinical and/or scientific problems related to issues discussed in class; (b) to propose viable approaches to study the problems; and (c) to be able to convey these ideas using an analytical approach.¬† (Offered in alternate years ‚Äď not available 2021-22)

 

Y. FINER, STAFF

 

 

DEN1081S Bone Interfacing Implants

 

Osseointegration is a central tenant of current dental therapy‚ÄĒyet, not only is the concept poorly understood, but the terminology and dogma surrounding this vitally important concept confuses even the most engaged practitioners. This course discusses the concept of osseointegration from the perspective of bone biology. Bone is one of the many connective tissues; and to understand bone biology one has to have an understanding of connective tissue structure and function.¬† Of course, to truly understand the interface a multidisciplinary approach is necessary to take into account both the material and biological variables. To address this subject matter, the course is centered around every student being able to identify and critically evaluate each of the connective tissues. We do this by spending considerable time studying the microscopic structure of connective tissues; recording observations; and sharing information between the group. While this is happening a series of spontaneous tutorials, generated predominantly as a function of student inquiry, guides the group towards a unique understanding of the biology of, and logic that drives, osseointegration.¬† It transpires that osseointegration is a wound healing phenomenon that reflects many natural phenomena where a new equilibrium is established following a disruption of homeostasis. Recently, as a result of work undertaken at the U of T, it has become possible, for the first time, to objectively compare the osseointegration rate and ultimate strength of bone anchorage of differing implant designs.¬† Neither prior knowledge of connective tissue biology, nor material surface design, is required; but an inquiring mind is essential. (Offered in alternate years ‚Äď available 2020-21).

 

JE. DAVIES, STAFF

 



 

DEN1098F/S Reading Course in Oral Health Sciences

 

The purpose of this course is to offer instruction in specialized topics that are not part of regular graduate courses. It consists of assigned readings that are discussed in weekly meetings with the course director.

 

Interested students should approach the graduate staff member whom they would like to direct their reading course. Staff members who agree to direct a course should submit a course outline that includes a list of papers to be discussed and the grading method to be used, to the Associate Dean, Graduate Education. The reading course must conform to regulations established by the Department and the School of Graduate Studies (Available in the Student Services Office). The Faculty will normally only consider one reading course to complete your degree requirements. In exceptional circumstances this requirement may be waived.

 

 

GRADUATE COURSES OFFERED BY THE FACULTY TO MEET SPECIALITY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
 

 

DEN1002S Oral Pathology

 

This is a weekly seminar course that reviews the pathology of oral soft and hard tissues, to prepare graduate students in various Dental Specialty Programs for specialty practice. Students are expected to participate in discussions of the pathology underlying broad categories of disease, for example, infections, developmental defects, reactive hyperplasia, benign and malignant tumors, and to use this understanding to develop rational schemes for differential diagnosis and treatment. Students will also learn about recent advances in oral and surgical pathology, including their potential application to diagnosis and patient management.

 

I. LEONG, STAFF
 

 

DEN1003F Preventive Dentistry

 

This course uses a seminar format to discuss and develop critical thinking among graduate students in regards to the aetiology, risk assessment, and prevention of oral diseases and conditions. Preventive dentistry aims to maintain and improve the oral health status of individuals and populations. The typical image of preventive dentistry is to prevent dental caries in a patient. However, prevention of dental caries at the individual level only represents one part of preventive dentistry. Preventive dentistry integrates primordial, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary prevention, along with considerations at the individual and population level, including the oral-systemic health link, and involvement of other health and social service providers in the prevention of all oral diseases and conditions. The course is available to all graduate students at the faculty.
 

C.¬†QUI√ĎONEZ, STAFF

 

DEN1006Y Dental Public Health Seminars

 

 This course uses a seminar format to survey the discipline of dental public health. This includes the determinants of health, primary health care, oral health care systems, insurance, health economics, health planning and evaluation, and ethical issues in dentistry.  The course is available for all graduate students at the faculty.

 

C.¬†QUI√ĎONEZ, STAFF
 


DEN1007F Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology

 

This lecture and seminar course will review fundamental principles of radiobiology and radiation protection, and the application of conventional and advanced imaging modalities in the interpretation of abnormalities of the oral and maxillofacial region that may be encountered in the practice of the dental specialties.

 

E. W. N LAM, STAFF

 

 

DEN1008S Cone Beam CT Imaging

 

This lecture and seminar course builds on the image interpretation concepts developed in DEN 1007F (Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology); a graduate level course for students enrolled in one of the M.Sc./dental specialty programs. This new course specifically emphasizes the applications of three-dimensional imaging in the form of limited/small (‚ȧ 8 cm) field-of-view cone beam computed tomography in the dental specialties.

 

Successful completion of this course will enable the student to make application to the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario for a permit to own and/or operate a limited/small field-of-view cone beam CT system on graduation. Prerequisite: DEN 1007F.

 

E. W. N. LAM, STAFF
 

DEN1011Y Advanced Seminars in Oral Pathology

This course is designed for the graduate students in Oral Pathology. In addition to the review of all cases received in the Oral Pathology Diagnostic Service, the course incudes formal and informal seminars on current topics in general pathology, oral histopathology and clinical oral pathology. The Oral Pathology course (DEN1002S) must be taken either before or simultaneously with this course.

 

G. BRADLEY, STAFF

 

 

DEN1012Y Oral Medicine

 

This course is conducted in various relevant departments of the University affiliated teaching hospitals and through seminars, a pharmacology course and case discussions. Experience is obtained in the investigation, diagnosis and management of a wide range of diseases and disorders of the oral and craniofacial structures including oral mucosal and salivary gland diseases/disorders and orofacial pain/dysfunctions. As well, students gain experience in the management of patients with complicating medical conditions.

 

I. LEONG, STAFF
 

 

DEN1013Y Oral Surgical Pathology

 

The course is organized as a series of clinical-pathological conferences and covers all forms of disease of the mouth. A case-based approach is used for teaching and learning.  Emphasis is placed on synthesizing clinical, radiographic and histological data for a comprehensive evaluation of the case being discussed. The material for study is derived from the Oral Pathology Diagnostic Service and the hospital pathology departments. Current cases of interest are studied and in addition the surgical pathology of all oral disease is covered in a systematic manner.

 

The course is divided into two sections. The first part is the clinical-pathological component held weekly.  Students have the opportunity to review the case histories and virtual microscopic slides of the cases to be presented in the upcoming session, so they can be prepared to discuss the differential diagnosis and treatment, as well as controversies in treatment and topics that require further clinical research. The second part consists of a rotation for individual students to Oral Pathology, to be organized with the head of the respective graduate programs. The rotation provides an immersion in Oral Pathology that is appropriate for the student’s future specialty practice.

 

G. BRADLEY, STAFF

 

DEN1016S Occlusion: Function and Dysfunction

 

This is a lecture- and seminar- based course held for graduate and postgraduate students in the second-term of the academic year (2 hours per week). This course integrates current knowledge of dental occlusion by presenting a multidisciplinary array of lectures delivered by experts in prosthodontics, periodontics, orthodontics, pedodontics, oral and maxillofacial surgery, dental materials, oral neurophysiology, speech pathology and sleep bruxism. It also utilizes topical reading and evidence-based discussion seminars led by course participants and critical appraisal assignments of recent peer-reviewed publications. The aims of this course are to demonstrate that multidisciplinary clinical approaches that take into consideration developmental, biological, neurophysiological, psychological and biomechanical factors are indispensable in the diagnosis, management and prevention of a dysfunctional dental occlusion. This course is targeted principally at postgraduate candidates in clinical dental specialties. Participants are required to have a dental degree. Successful completion of the course is based on mandatory attendance in all seminars, a topic presentation, a written assignment, short quizzes and participation and demonstration of critical appraisal skills in the seminars and the written assignments. (Offered in alternate years ‚Äď not available 2021-22 ).

 

L. AVIVI-ARBER, STAFF
 

DEN1017S Temporomandibular Disorders

The objective of this course is to integrate the latest evidence in basic and clinical sciences related to temporomandibular disorders (TMD), in order to improve knowledge on differential diagnosis, TMD etiology, mechanisms and evidence-based management. The course will also address the socioeconomic burden of acute and chronic pain, in addition to their effects on the patient‚Äôs quality of life. The topics will be presented by various scholars, dental and medical specialists. ¬†(Offered in alternate years ‚Äď ¬†available 2021-22).

 

I. CIOFFI, STAFF

 

 

DEN1033Y Yr I; DEN1034Y Yr II; and DEN1035Y Yr III - Periodontology - Seminars and Clinics

 

This ongoing course represents a three-year major program consisting of educational experiences targeted directly at developing the knowledge and clinical skill required of a specialist in periodontics, including many aspects not covered in other required courses.  Seminars will include Conscious Sedation, Periodontics-Prosthodontics Treatment Planning, Therapeutics, Clinical Photography, Practice Management, and Surgical Periodontics. Clinical rotations include Implant Prosthodontic Unit, Periodontal Consultation Service for severe and refractory diseases, and hospital rotations for Periodontal Care of Medically Compromised patients, oral medicine, and diagnosis and treatment of facial pain and temporomandibular disorders. Residents will also be exposed to training in single drug

I.V. sedation techniques, and other conscious sedation methods. There will be seminars in oral medicine and in the interrelationships of Orthodontics, Endodontics and Prosthodontics with Periodontology. (See Clinical Conferences).

 

V. MENDES, STAFF

 

 

DEN1036Y Periodontology - Literature Review in Periodontology Yr I & II

 

The literature review program combines required reading and review of discussion points in order to gain an understanding of the classic and current literature in the field of periodontology. ¬†Each week, the student is presented with a list of articles that cover a given subject in its entirety. ¬†The student is expected over the course of the year to have read and be familiar with each article. ¬†Articles are chosen due to their ‚Äúclassic‚ÄĚ standing, or because they highlight a given learning objective. ¬†This allows to student to focus on these articles for the weekly discussions in our seminar series. ¬†Along with a ‚Äúclassic‚ÄĚ literature review, seminars are designated for current literature review in the most recent journals.

 

M. GOLDBERG, STAFF
 


DEN1037Y Clinical Case Presentations - Yrs II & III

 

Residents present their clinical cases and are expected to defend the treatment provided. All aspects of the presentation will be covered which includes the medical history, clinical and radiographic interpretation, diagnosis, etiology, prognosis, treatment planning, therapy and periodontal maintenance.

 

V. MENDES, STAFF
 

 

DEN1038Y - Biomaterials & Implant/Reconstructive Dentistry - Yrs II & III

 

The didactic portion involves seminars that focus on the surgical and restorative aspects of implant therapy, biomaterials, tissue biology and tissue engineering. The clinical aspect is primarily related to treatment planning and techniques in advanced implant reconstructive and plastics such as the surgical principles and techniques on various implant systems, ridge augmentation and site development procedures.

 

V. MENDES, STAFF

 

DEN1039Y Periodontology - Principles and Practice of ‚Äď Yrs I, II, and III

 

These weekly seminars review the clinical cases that are being performed by the residents.  They also include discussions on various topics in Periodontology, such as treatment plan, appropriate therapy and relevant periodontal literature.  Residents will also present selected topics on various aspects related to periodontal therapy.

 

V. MENDES, STAFF

 

 

DEN1041Y Prosthodontics I ‚Äď Prosthodontic Treatment Planning and Case Presentations

 

Patients demonstrate a wide range of phenotypes and treatment needs following congenital conditions or diseases that have affected the orofacial complex. Consequently, comprehensive treatment plans are required for all patients in need of complex rehabilitative care. The focus of these weekly sessions are patient presentations given by the residents, with an expectation that treatment plans will be articulated in the context of evidence-based and patient-mediated concerns. Presentations by residents in the beginning of their training focus on chief complaint, assessment, diagnosis and treatment planning. Presentations by residents further along in their training focus on care delivery and outcome assessment.

 

D. CHVARTSZAID, E. BEHROOZ, STAFF

 

 

DEN1042Y Prosthodontics II ‚Äď Key Concepts in Prosthodontics and Laboratory Management

 

The seminar course will cover key concepts, methods and materials in prosthodontics, and laboratory management and is intended to prepare students for patient care.

 

D. CHVARTSZAID, STAFF

 

DEN1043Y Prosthodontics III ‚Äď Advanced Prosthodontic Topical Seminars

 

This course will consist of seminars on current topics in prosthodontics including assessment, diagnosis, aetiology, (patho)physiology, risk, prognosis, biomaterials, diseases and conditions of relevance to prosthodontics, clinical treatment approaches (incl. maxillofacial), and complications. The course will enable the student to become familiar with the various materials and methods for appraising the prosthodontic patient. Diagnosis, treatment planning, and the different fixed and removable or implant supported methods for patient treatment are analyzed and discussed. Students will be expected to develop the judgment and skills required to manage complex prosthodontic needs. The specific topics in this course vary from year to year.

 

D. CHVARTSZAID, STAFF

 

DEN1044Y Prosthodontics IV - Prosthodontic Current Literature


This seminar course reviews and critically appraises the current scientific literature pertaining to prosthodontics. This course is designed to help the students develop the necessary skill for critical reading of the scientific literature, while also acquiring knowledge of the most current advances in the diverse areas of research in prosthodontics and related areas. During weekly seminars, the students select, present and defend what they have identified as the best research papers in the contemporary literature relevant to prosthodontic care.

 

D. CHVARTSZAID, N. HAJIRA,L. AVIVI-ARBER, E. SOMOGYI-GANSS, STAFF

 

 

DEN1045Y Prosthodontics V ‚ÄďLiterature and Techniques in Surgery

 

This course aims to provide the student with the understanding

 of scientific literature, biologic basis and clinical approaches in Surgery, including surgical anatomy, surgical management and surgical complications.

 

D. CHVARTSZAID, M. LIN, STAFF

 

 

DEN1046Y Prosthodontics VI ‚Äď Clinical Prosthodontics

 

Extensive clinical training is provided over three years in the Graduate Prosthodontics clinic. Treatments are done in close cooperation with specialists in other clinical specialties and dental technicians in relation to treatment planning and patient management. On-site and off-site clinical rotations supplement core clinical training.  On-site rotation to the Implant Prosthodontic Unit (IPU) focuses on implant-related surgical training.  Off-site rotations focus on management of patients with specific needs. Rotation to the Princess Margaret Hospital focuses on Maxillofacial Prosthodontics and oncologic management. Rotation to the Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital focuses on management of Prosthodontic needs in a pediatric population.

 

D. CHVARTSZAID, M. CHOU, STAFF

 

 

DEN1051Y Oral Epidemiology

 

The purpose of this course is to present the principles and methods of epidemiology and their application in the study of oral and craniofacial diseases. Special emphasis is given to observational and experimental research designs and to the techniques of dental survey research. The course includes a detailed examination of clinical measures of oral health status and socio-dental indicators. Students have the opportunity to apply the skills taught to the preparation of a comprehensive research proposal.

 

H.P. LAWRENCE

 

 

DEN1052Y General Anaesthesia for Medical Procedures ‚Äď Pediatric

 

This program involves a rotation at the Hospital for Sick Children under the direction of the Department of Anaesthesia. The objective of this course is to learn the principles and application of general anaesthesia to children in the hospital setting. This is accomplished by gaining direct experience in all aspects of the administration of general anaesthesia for pediatric medical procedures.

 

M. WONG, M. CRAWFORD, M. LAM, STAFF, DEPARTMENT OF ANAESTHESIA, HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN

 

DEN1052Y General Anaesthesia for Medical Procedures ‚Äď Pediatric

This course introduces general anaesthesia for pediatric medical procedures at Michael Garron Hospital’s Department of Anaesthesia and for pediatric dental procedures at the Faculty of Dentistry’s anaesthesia facility. Residents engage in an immersive rotation at the Hospital for Sick Children under the direction of the Department of Anaesthesia. The objective of this course is to learn the principles and application of general anaesthesia to children in the hospital setting. This course is taken in year two.

M. WONG, J. MAYNES, M. LAM, STAFF, DEPARTMENT OF ANAESTHESIA, HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN

 

DEN1055F Basic Principles of Dental Anaesthesia

This self-directed online reading course takes place weekly in the Fall term of residency. Weekly assigned readings will cover the subjects of anatomy, respiratory and cardiovascular physiology relevant to the practice of sedation and anaesthesia. Evaluation will consist of weekly online quizzes, oral assessments, and one written assignment at the end of the course. This course is a requirement for first year dental anaesthesia residents.

C. YARASCAVITCH 

 

DEN1056Y Basic Concepts in Clinical Medicine

The objective of this course is to provide dental anaesthesia residents with the clinical knowledge and skills of physical evaluation and medical risk assessment. This will build on the academic basis of the course ‚ÄúFoundations of Medicine as applied to Dental Anaesthesia‚ÄĚ. It will consist of a 3-hour per week clinical session for the first year in the program.

N. TENN-LYN

 

DEN1061H Research Practicum

 

The research practicum aims to give students hands-on experience of one or more components of the research process. This can include analyzing an existing data set, undertaking a systematic review and/or meta-analysis or a review article. This type of experience will give students the opportunity to use skills in, and an appreciation of, such matters as literature searching, hypothesis setting, experimental design, methodological limitations, laboratory practice, and writing a paper for publication. Consequently, it provides a more limited exposure to the research process than research leading to a M.Sc. level thesis. The requirements for this course can be met by undertaking a research project or an essay in the form of a review article. In either case, the required outcome is a paper in a format suitable for publication. The research practicum will be undertaken with the assistance of an appropriate supervisor and examined by a committee comprised of three faculty members, at least one of whom is from the student’s specialty.

 

STAFF

 

 

DEN1062S Pharmacology of Dental Therapeutics

 

The course is aimed at providing an up to date review of the pharmacological principles of therapeutic management of clinical conditions relevant to the practice of dentistry. This course emphasizes the need to apply a multidisciplinary approach to systemic pathologies and relevance for oral health. Topics include pain management, antimicrobials, respiratory, cardiovascular, central nervous system, anticoagulants, immunocompromised patients, antineoplastics and oral cancer and use of computer drug databases in patient management. Students have an opportunity to work in small groups and present clinical cases of patients with complex systemic and oral pathologies.

 

A.J. LAN“™A, STAFF

 

 

DEN1063Y Practicum in Dental Public Health

 

 A student will normally be assigned for 14 weeks to an agency that provides dental public health services or is engaged in dental public health-related issues. The purpose is to learn, by observation and participation, methods of management used by the agency and to conduct a project of use to the agency. A dental public health specialist or other leader from the agency will supervise the student with periodic contact from director of the program.
 

C.¬†QUI√ĎONEZ, STAFF

 

 

DEN1064S Management Principles in Canadian Dental Health Organizations

 

This course will develop skills in analysis and decision-making among students to enable them to manage organizations, which provide or fund dental education or care services. Students will be expected to participate in all sessions from the basis of selected readings. In addition, students will have to write and present an analysis in dental services management. Topics to be covered include: legislation, case studies in dental organizations, managing human resources, planning, promoting quality, information systems, and program evaluation. The course is available for all graduate students at the faculty. (Course offered in alternating years ‚Äď not available 2020-21).

 

F. RASHID, P. SHARMA, STAFF

 

 

DEN1071H Medical Anaesthesia Seminars I

 

These seminars are conducted by members of the Department of Anaesthesia, Faculty of Medicine. Topics include equipment and monitors, patient safety, acute pain, regional anaesthesia, perioperative medicine and chronic pain. This course is taken in year one. This is a credit/ non-credit based course.

 

C. YARASCAVITCH, L. BAHREY, DEPT. OF ANAESTHESIA, FACULTY OF MEDICINE

 

DEN1071H Medical Anaesthesia Seminars I

These online seminars are conducted by members of the Department of Anaesthesia, Faculty of Medicine. Topics include equipment and monitors, patient safety, acute pain, regional anaesthesia, perioperative medicine and chronic pain. This course is taken in year two. This is a credit/ non-credit based course.

C. YARASCAVITCH, L. BAHREY, DEPT. OF ANAESTHESIA, FACULTY OF MEDICINE

 

DEN1072H Medical Anaesthesia Seminars II

These online seminars are conducted by members of the Department of Anaesthesia, Faculty of Medicine. Topics include pediatric anaesthesia, cardiovascular and respiratory system physiology and‚ÄĮanaesthesia, trauma and resuscitation. This course is taken in year three. This is a credit/ non-credit based course.

C. YARASCAVITCH, L. BAHREY, DEPT. OF ANAESTHESIA, FACULTY OF MEDICINE

 

DEN1073Y Dental Anaesthesia Graduate Seminars

This weekly course consists of both Faculty-led and student-led presentations that cover a range of topics relevant to dental anaesthesia. Residents receive introductory lessons in pharmacology from Faculty. The student presentations cover the management of anaesthesia for common systemic diseases, with facilitation and feedback from Faculty. Students apply anaesthesia planning principles to case-based learning exercises. 

M. WONG, A. OUANOUNOU, D. DECLOUX, STAFF

 

DEN1074Y Foundations of Medicine as Applied to Dental Anaesthesia

The objective of this course is to provide the academic basis of clinical medicine for residents in dental anaesthesia. The content will include: interpretation of complete medical histories; techniques of physical examination; interpretation of physical evaluation results; understanding the implications of systemic disease, in particular those of the cardiovascular, respiratory and endocrine systems; understanding the indications for and interpretations of laboratory studies and other techniques used in physical diagnosis and preoperative evaluation.

The course will consist of 3 hours of seminars per week, divided into 2 weekly sessions, for the fall term of the first year in the program and combined into a single weekly session in the winter term of the first year of the program.

N. TENN-LYN

 

DEN1075Y General Anaesthesia for Dental Procedures ‚Äď Pediatric

This course involves clinical application of general anaesthesia for pediatric dental patients. Residents gain experience in administering general anaesthetics for children in an outpatient setting, using both intubated and non-intubated techniques. The clinics take place in the anaesthesia facility at the Faculty of Dentistry, seven half-days per week, with an additional half-day per week in pre-operative assessment consultations. Each resident will spend 6 months on this clinical assignment. A concurrent asynchronous online reading course enriches the residents’ clinical experiences. Residents give a seminar on PALS and create an emergency manual for peer and Faculty feedback. Core simulations in airway and common anaesthesia emergencies is a course requirement. This course is taken in year three.

M. WONG, P. COPP, C. YARASCAVITCH, STAFF

 

DEN1076H General Anaesthesia for Medical Procedures ‚Äď Adult I

This program involves rotations for the dental anaesthesia resident under the direction of the Department of Anaesthesia, Michael Garron Hospital. The objective of this course is to learn the principles and application of general anaesthesia to adults in the hospital setting. This is accomplished by gaining direct experience in all aspects of the administration of general anaesthesia for medical procedures. This course is taken in year one.

M. WONG, D. LAM, L. SHULMAN, STAFF, DEPARTMENT OF ANAESTHESIA, MICHAEL GARRON HOSPITAL

 

DEN1077H General Anaesthesia for Medical Procedures ‚Äď Adult II

This program involves rotations for the dental anaesthesia resident under the direction of the Department of Anaesthesia, Michael Garron Hospital. The objective of this course is to practice the principles and application of general anaesthesia to adults in the hospital setting autonomously. This is accomplished by direct experience in all aspects of the administration of general anaesthesia for medical procedures. This course is taken in year three.

M. WONG, D. LAM, L. SHULMAN, STAFF, DEPARTMENT OF ANAESTHESIA, MICHAEL GARRON HOSPITAL

 

DEN1078H General Anaesthesia for Dental Procedures ‚Äď Adult I

This course involves clinical application of all modalities of sedation and anaesthesia for dental patients, with the focus on deep sedation and general anaesthesia. Faculty-led workshops on preoperative assessment, consultations, and electrocardiogram interpretation are given. First year residents give presentations on anaesthesia emergencies for peer and Faculty feedback. Residents gain experience in the full range of sedation and non-intubated anaesthetic techniques for adults. Clinics take place in the anaesthesia facility at the Faculty of Dentistry, five half-days per week. Residents also spend one day per week administering deep sedation to medically complex patients with mental or physical challenges in the Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Sciences at Sunnybrook Health Science Centre. Core simulations in airway and common anaesthesia emergencies are a course requirement. Emphasis is on skill acquisition.

C. YARASCAVITCH, M. WONG, P. NKANSAH, STAFF

 

DEN1079H General Anaesthesia for Dental Procedures‚Äď Adult II

This course involves clinical application of all modalities of sedation and anaesthesia for dental patients, with the focus on deep sedation and general anaesthesia. Third year residents give a seminar on ACLS for peer and Faculty feedback. Residents gain experience in the full range of sedation and non-intubated anaesthetic techniques for adults. Clinics take place in the anaesthesia facility at the Faculty of Dentistry, five half-days per week. Residents also spend one day per week administering deep sedation to medically complex patients with mental or physical challenges in the Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Sciences at Sunnybrook Health Science Centre and one half-day per week in the Department of Dentistry at Mount Sinai Hospital. Core simulations in airway and common anaesthesia emergencies are a course requirement. Emphasis is on skills refinement.

M. WONG, C. YARASCAVITCH, P. NKANSAH, D. DECLOUX, STAFF

 

DEN1083Y Experiences in Clinical Medicine

The objective of this course is to provide clinical experience in medicine for residents in dental anaesthesia. Residents complete rotations in the Department of Internal Medicine at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the Departments of Cardiology and Respirology at Women’s College Hospital. Emphasis is on the application of knowledge and clinical skills in a variety of patient care contexts. This course is taken in year two. This is a credit/ no credit course.

M. WONG, Z. FEILCHENFELD, DEPT. OF INTERNAL MEDICINE, SUNNYBROOK HEALTH SCIENCES, J. MORIC, WOMEN’S COLLEGE HOSPITAL; STAFF

 

DEN1084H; DEN 1085H; DEN1086H Experiences in Clinical Teaching Yrs I, II, III

The objective of this course is to strengthen understanding of instructional pedagogy and teaching skills. Developed from the Centre for Faculty Development Teaching and Learning Collaboration workshops, this course consists of small group instruction and practical teaching assignments. Residents participate in workshops on best educational practices for learning in clinical contexts to prepare themselves for instructor roles. Mandatory teaching assignments consist of a minimum of 10 half-days per year in each of the three years of the program. Seminar facilitation and clinical supervision is carried out in the Faculty clinics for: second year undergraduate dental students local anesthetic techniques; third year dental students and dentists enrolled in continuing education for nitrous oxide and oxygen sedation techniques; fourth year dental student medical emergency seminars and simulations; peer teaching for dental anaesthesia residents. Progress is measured by a portfolio of personal reflections and objective evaluations. (Credit/No credit courses)

C. YARASCAVITCH, STAFF 

 

DEN1087Y; DEN1088Y; DEN1089Y Fundamentals of Dental Anaesthesia Yrs I; II and III

This course consists of three foundational components: Journal Review, Clinical Rounds, and Oral Examination. On a weekly basis, residents rotate in a leadership role providing formal presentations to peers and faculty. Literature applicable to the field of dental anesthesia is reviewed to exercise critical appraisal skills and inform dental anaesthesia practice. Clinical patient cases are presented to encourage reflection on practice and quality assurance in patient care. On a bi-annual basis in December and June, residents complete an oral examination in dental anaesthesia and related topics in order to assess progress and prepare for board certification.

M. WONG, C. YARASCAVITCH, P. COPP, STAFF

 

 

 

 

DEN1090H Inhalation and Oral Minimal and Moderate Sedation for Dental Procedures

 

The objective of this course is to provide sufficient teaching and experience in inhalational and oral minimal and moderate sedation for clinical qualification by jurisdictional regulatory authorities. This course consists of both didactic and clinical components. A passing grade on a written examination is required in order to successfully complete the course. This course is taken by graduate dental specialty students at the discretion of their program.

 

The objective of this course is to provide instruction for minimal and moderate sedation for patient care. The modalities taught include nitrous oxide & oxygen, oral sedation, and their combination. The course provides sufficient didactic and clinical experience for certification to provide these modalities in Ontario. A passing grade on a written examination is required in order to successfully complete the course. There is a mandatory hands-on element included in this course. This course is taken by graduate dental specialty students at the discretion of their program.

 

P. NKANSAH

 

 

DEN1091Y Parenteral Moderate Sedation for Dental Procedures

 

The objective of this course is to provide sufficient teaching and experience in parenteral moderate sedation for clinical qualification by jurisdictional regulatory authorities. This course consists of both didactic and patient care components. In accordance with licensing authorities, a pass score on written examination is needed to successfully complete the course.  A minimum of 20 supervised clinical cases is required in order to achieve qualification for registration with licensing authorities. This course is taken by graduate dental specialty students at the discretion of their program.

 

The objective of this course is to provide sufficient teaching and clinical experience in parenteral moderate sedation to qualify for certification for the use of this modality in Ontario. A passing grade on a written examination is required in order to successfully complete the course. There are mandatory hands-on training elements included in the course. Actual clinical cases are not included in the course but are required for certification in Ontario. This course is taken by graduate dental specialty students at the discretion of their program.

 

P. NKANSAH

 

 

DEN1094Y Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology I

 

The objective of this Year 1 course is directed toward the interpretation and diagnosis of diseases of the maxillofacial region, and to stimulate the critical analysis of the application of diagnostic imaging for this purpose. The course consists of seminars and radiologic clinics that are composed of the following components: seminars in advanced radiologic interpretation of abnormalities and diseases of the maxillofacial region; a radiologic clinic and radiologic rounds directed to the investigation of abnormalities and diseases of the maxillofacial region; seminars in the mechanisms of disease with correlations to their appearances on diagnostic images; and review of the current literature in oral and maxillofacial radiology. Clinical training includes practical experiences with the applications of extraoral and intraoral radiology, sialography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnostic process.

 

CO-REQUISITE ‚Äď DEN1007F

E. W. N. LAM, STAFF

 

DEN1095Y Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology II

 

This course builds on the foundations developed in DEN1094Y. This Year 2 course consists of seminars and radiologic clinics that are composed of the following components: seminars in advanced radiologic interpretation of abnormalities and diseases of the maxillofacial region; a radiologic clinic and radiologic rounds directed to the investigation of abnormalities and diseases of the maxillofacial region; seminars in the mechanisms of disease with correlations to their appearances on diagnostic images; and review of the current literature in oral and maxillofacial radiology. Clinical training includes practical experiences with the applications of extraoral and intraoral radiology, sialography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnostic process.

 

PRE-REQUISITE ‚Äď DEN1094Y E. W. N. LAM, STAFF

DEN1096Y Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology III

 

This course builds on the foundations developed in DEN1094Y and DEN1095Y.  This Year 3 course consists of seminars and radiologic clinics that are composed of the following components: seminars in advanced radiologic interpretation of abnormalities and diseases of the maxillofacial region; a radiologic clinic and radiologic rounds directed to the investigation of abnormalities and diseases of the maxillofacial region; seminars in the mechanisms of disease with correlations to their appearances on diagnostic images; and review of the current literature in oral and maxillofacial radiology.  Clinical training includes practical experiences with the applications of extraoral and intraoral radiology, sialography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnostic process.

 

PRE-REQUISITE ‚Äď DEN1095Y E. W. N. LAM, STAFF

 

DEN2001Y Orthodontics 1 ‚Äď Advanced Orthodontic Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

First Year Residents

 

Various methods of appraising dentofacial deformities and growth trends are discussed. The diagnosis and treatment planning of surgical cases and temporomandibular joint problems are included, as is an introduction to biomechanics. Also included is a concentrated laboratory technique course as preparation for clinical practice. The course is limited to orthodontics graduate students.

 

S. SURI, STAFF

 

 

DEN2002Y Orthodontics 2 ‚Äď Biomechanics, Orthodontic Technique and Practice Administration

Second Year Residents

 

An analysis of standard orthodontic appliances discussing the theory, indications and contraindications of each is carried out. Extensive technique and seminar courses are presented and include practice administration considerations. This instruction continues and develops over two years with the goal being to expand the student’s expertise in advanced orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning that was introduced in Orthodontics 1. A multidisciplinary approach to the various orthodontic mechanisms is stressed. The course is limited to orthodontics graduate students.

 

S. SURI, STAFF

 

 

DEN2003Y Orthodontics 3 ‚Äď Orthodontic Technique and Clinical Practice

Third Year Residents

 

This is a concentrated clinical course, extending over three years, involving patient treatment under the supervision of staff. This includes diagnosis and treatment planning as well as actual clinical treatment of assigned cases. The predominant orthodontic techniques are stressed including surgical orthodontic treatment, adult orthodontics and functional appliance therapy. Throughout the course, the knowledge and theory discussed in Orthodontics 1 and 2 will be thoroughly applied and expanded upon. The course is limited to orthodontics graduate students.

 

S. SURI, STAFF

 

 

DEN2004Y Orthodontics 4 ‚Äď Interceptive Orthodontics

Third Year Residents

 

Students are required to teach, under the supervision of staff, in the undergraduate orthodontic program in order to familiarize themselves further with the diagnosis and management methods pertinent to the field of interceptive orthodontics. They are expected to prepare and participate in basic diagnostic seminars, technical instruction and seminar sessions. This is an extension of the staff supervised teaching experience the students gain during the first year of their residency, when the residents teach seminars related to the diagnosis of malocclusion, normal and abnormal facial growth and occlusal development to students in the undergraduate orthodontic program.

 

S. SURI, STAFF


    DEN2005Y Surgical Orthodontics

This course is a collaborative educational component of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Orthodontic  programs. It exposes the OMFS and Orthodontic residents to a comprehensive, detailed, and innovative clinic. The Centre for Corrective Jaw Surgery at the University of Toronto is unique in Canada and is a weekly clinic held in the orthodontic clinic with patient visits. Orthodontic follow up, presurgical orthognathic surgery preparation and post-operative aftercare are all provided in this clinic. Operative orthognathic surgery (assisted by orthodontic residents) takes place at Mount Sinai or Humber River hospitals. Milestones in orthognathic surgery and in surgical orthodontics are met through clinic, seminar and operating room interactions. Supported by industry grants, special access allows the residents to have the full experience of digital planning:  virtual surgical preparation, surgical guide fabrication, surgical orthodontic diagnosis and treatment. The course is further enhanced by 24 cased-based seminars covering the full scope of facial deformity correction. These seminars are jointly  presented by OMFS and Orthodontic teams, staff,  and guest lecturers

M. CAMINITI, A. SHOJAEI, B. VENDITELLI
 

DEN2006Y Facial Growth and Facial Analysis

 

A seminar course presenting the cephalometric analysis developed using data from The Burlington Growth & Research Centre. An in-depth study of its clinical application in the understanding of facial growth patterns is presented.

 

S. SURI, M. PATRICIAN

 

 

DEN2007Y Craniofacial Anomalies

 

A course of seminars extending over two terms in which congenital anomalies of the craniofacial complex are discussed with reference to etiology, facial growth and development and treatment. The multidisciplinary team approach to treatment is emphasized.

Clinical experience is derived through the facilities of the Hospital for Sick Children, in the management of problems associated with anomalies such as cleft palate. (Offered in alternate years ‚Äď not available 2020-21)
 

S. SURI, STAFF

 

 

DEN2008Y Craniofacial Anatomy and Osteology

 A guided, self-study basic course in cranial osteology, embryology, comparative vertebrate anatomy, and radiology of the bones of the head.

W.J. JENKINS, B. LIEBGOTT, E. LAM

 

DEN2009H Classic Theories of Craniofacial Growth
A guided reading seminar course covering classical theories of craniofacial growth. References are cited refuting or supporting these theories. Students learn not only about the scientific and clinical evidence to support the 6 main theories of craniofacial growth and development, but they also learn to critically analyze this evidence and apply it to their own understanding and clinical exposure. The objective of the second part of the course is to give the student an understanding and working knowledge of the current concept of craniofacial growth at the molecular and genetic levels. Key aspects of craniofacial embryology, general concepts of patterning in development, pattering in craniofacial development and the molecular basis of a specific craniofacial disorder are discussed. This involves recent research advances in molecular biologic factors in facial growth as well as the clinical relevance of craniofacial growth.

 

N. NARGASKI, S-G GONG

 

 

 

DEN2010H Tissue Reaction to Orthodontic and Orthopedic Forces

 

The objective of the course is to investigate the reaction of tissues to forces created by orthodontic and functional appliances. The areas to be covered are: a) Reaction of the periodontal ligament, cortical bone, attached and free gingiva, the root and the pulp to orthodontic tooth movement with heavy and light forces; b) Muscle reaction to orthodontic and orthopedic forces: c) The condyle.

 

Students are required to write a term paper on a particular topic and to present this paper to the class. Students are required to plan an original project in conjunction with their term paper topic.

 

S. SURI, G. ALTUNA

 

 

DEN2011Y Craniofacial Morphology and Development

 

A seminar course that covers morphological variations, and their methods of detection and treatment from the historic and current perspective. Topics of great significance and relevance to the specialty that require a focused synthesis of the literature are included.

 

S. SURI

 

DEN3001Y Oral Surgery 1 ‚Äď The Physiological Basis of Disease

 

This course provides the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery resident with the fundamental medical knowledge. It covers physical diagnosis, medicine and physiology. It is required for patient care and management, especially in the pre and post-operative phases, and for general consults in a hospital setting. The course also provides an assessment of current literature and clinical research. The relationship of the basic sciences (physiology, pharmacology, biochemistry and microbiology) to disease processes through a systematic discipline, is emphasized.

 

M. CAMINITI, N. BLANAS , STAFF

 

 

DEN3002Y Oral Surgery 2 ‚Äď Principles and Practice of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

 

The didactic component of this course provides the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery resident with a complete understanding of the diagnosis and surgical management of diseases of the head, face, and neck regions. Seminar presentations use a case-based format. Residents participate in all areas of the clinical practice of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Sound judgment is developed through the formulation of differential diagnoses, rational treatment options and participation in the surgical procedures. In Year I, the clinical component is primarily related to the care of inpatients and an introduction to simple operative procedures. It also provides a thorough and rigorous introduction to surgery and surgical principles in general. In years III and IV, advanced clinical practice and increasing levels of responsibility for patient care are demanded which culminate in a high level of surgical skill and knowledge.

 

M. CAMINITI, K. CUDDY, STAFF

 

 

Clinical Methods

 

The Clinical Methods course will review the fundamentals of physical examination and diagnosis. It will focus mainly on the skills required for a comprehensive examination of the patient. This includes interviewing, physical diagnosis, radiographic interpretation, as well as the investigation and interpretation of laboratory studies. Students will have the opportunity to observe and question their teacher-practitioners in order to learn the more intangible aspects of practice ‚Äď professional attitudes, philosophy, and the ethical standards. Off-service rotations include a year of immersion in other medical subspecialties including emergency medicine, general surgery, anaesthesia and internal medicine.

 

M. CAMINITI, STAFF

 

 

DEN3003Y Oral Surgery 3‚Äď Evidence-based Literature Reviews in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

 

The practice of evidence-based medicine requires the ability to define a problem and to assess, summarize and apply the information derived from current literature to daily clinical care. This course introduces the concepts of evidence-based practice and provides the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery resident with practice in critical appraisal of the current literature. A review of selected journals on a regular basis also ensures the resident’s familiarity with contemporary practice.

 

M. CAMINITI, K. CUDDY, STAFF

 

 

DEN3004Y Oral Surgery 4 ‚Äď Applied Surgical Anatomy of the Head and Neck

 

This course is designed to teach anatomy for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Particular attention is focused on the surgical approaches of the head, face, neck and calvarium. Techniques for harvesting bone and development of local, regional and free flaps for reconstruction are reviewed. It explores 16 core surgical competencies in approaching the broad scope required for oral and maxillofacial surgeons. It is an extension of DEN 3005H with focus on surgical and technical skills acquisition.

 

M. CAMINITI,  STAFF

 

 

DEN3005H Head and Neck Anatomy

 

The Division of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, together with the Faculty of Dentistry, offers a comprehensive head and neck anatomy course tailored for the specialties of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS), Endodontics and Prosthodontics. The course will comprise four-week (12 hour) lecture series and prosection review. There is an additional cadaver dissection and surgical approaches component (32 hours) for residents of the OMFS program.

 

Students will have access to specially prepared material, which may be studied in the Division of Anatomy. Dissection manuals will be available for the laboratory activities. Instructors and staff will be available during the surgical dissection laboratories and on a consulting basis.

 

V. MENDES AND M. CAMINITI, STAFF

 

DEN4001Y Pediatric Dentistry 1- Theoretical Pediatric Dentistry

This seminar course is continuous throughout the program. Reading assignments and periodic seminar presentations are assigned. The majority of these seminars are presented by the Department of Pediatric Dentistry, but may be given by members of other departments to include subjects such as Advanced Periodontics, Practice Management, Pediatric Pharmacology, Dental Public Health, and Hospital Dentistry, Feeding Disorders, Speech Pathology, Prevention, Cariology, as it applies to Pediatric Dentistry. Includes formal case presentations by the graduate students that must be prepared to the standards set by the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry.

K. CAMPBELL, H. NAINAR, R. MACMILLAN, G. GARISTO, J. WILES, M. CASAS, G. KULKARNI


DEN4002Y Pediatric Dentistry 2 - Journal Review

A series of discussions between faculty and graduate students, with active student participation to review critically current publications in journals related to pediatric dentistry.

K. CAMPBELL, H. NAINAR


DEN4003Y Pediatric Dentistry 3 - Facial & Dental Growth and Development in Pediatric Dentistry

This seminar course provides a comprehensive review of growth and development of the craniofacial complex.¬† The course focuses on head & neck anatomy and dental development from in utero to adolescence.¬† Several theories related to ‚Äúhow the head grows‚ÄĚ are discussed including an examination of the functional matrix theory as it applies to craniofacial growth. The principles of bone development in the craniofacial region are reviewed in great detail. The student will gain an understanding of the biology of soft and hard tissues in the cranium. The objective of the second part of the course is to give the student an understanding and working knowledge of the current concept of craniofacial growth at the molecular and genetic levels. Key aspects of craniofacial embryology, general concepts of patterning in development, patterning in craniofacial development and the molecular basis of a specific craniofacial disorder are discussed. This involves recent research advances in molecular biologic factors in facial growth as well as the clinical relevance of craniofacial growth.

K. CAMPBELL, D. CHANDRA, S. GONG


DEN4004H Pediatric Dentistry 4 - Child Behaviour Management

This is a seminar program in which students will review critically and discuss literature in principles of human behavior, developmental psychology, ethnicity and human behavior, and communication as it applies in the pediatric ‚Äútriangle‚ÄĚ concept. Various non-pharmacologic methods of guiding, managing and shaping behavior in the pediatric dental office will be discussed, from theoretical and practical perspectives. Some sessions will involve either case-based approaches to highlight behavioral aspects of dentistry or a review of videotapes of dentists, including graduate students in this course, interacting with patients.

K. CAMPBELL, M. PARK


DEN4005Y Pediatric Dentistry 5 - Clinical Pediatric Dentistry

This continuous three-year course will be phased out in 2022 as new individual one-year courses in Clinical Pediatric Dentistry are introduced. Clinical assignments are undertaken at various sites through a rotation schedule.  These encompass all clinical aspects related to the practice of the specialty of Pediatric Dentistry. The examination, diagnosis and treatment of the child patient and patients with special health care needs are supervised in the Graduate Pediatric Dentistry Clinic at the University of Toronto and in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the Hospital for Sick Children. The students will also be assigned to the Surgicentre at the Faculty of Dentistry for the comprehensive treatment of children using oral moderate sedation, non-intubated and intubated general anesthesia.  Additional clinical assignments over the 3 years may include City of Toronto Public Health Clinic and Mt. Sinai Hospital. All graduate students participate in after-hours emergency call at the Hospital for Sick Children in their core program. There is a mandatory two weekanesthesia rotation at SickKids and graduate students may have the choice of an additional 1 week elective rotation in any of the following areas: plastics/craniofacial surgery, cardiology, hematology, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehab Centre, among others.  Graduate  students also participate with clinical staff in weekly patient care conferences and chart auditing exercises.

K CAMPBELL AND STAFF PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY, UT. M. CASAS AND DENTAL STAFF, HOSPITAL FOR SICKCHILDREN, Mt. Sinai Dental Department Staff.
 

K CAMPBELL AND STAFF PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY, UT. M. CASAS AND DENTAL STAFF, HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN

DEN4006Y Pediatric Dentistry 6 ‚Äď Pediatric Oral Surgery

This course involves a series of presentations and reading assignments dealing with special issues in the pediatric oral and maxillofacial surgery patient. Topics include maxillofacial trauma, pediatric medical issues, odontogenic infections, TMJ disorders, tooth impactions, supernumerary teeth, ankylosed teeth, exposures, enucleations, cyst and tumors.

K. CAMPBELL, J. GARBEDIAN


DEN4007H Pediatric Dentistry 7 ‚Äď Pulp Therapy and Trauma

This seminar series reviews pertinent literature regarding pulpal therapy in the primary and young permanent dentition. The course will also include a comprehensive didactic review of endodontic therapy of the young permanent dentition. The trauma series of lecture/seminars is designed to prepare the graduate student in the diagnosis and clinical management of both mature and immature permanent teeth that have experienced pulp injury due to trauma. The course will provide the student with 1) a biological perspective on the clinical sequelae to traumatic injury, 2) a clinical approach to treatment and 3) an evaluative perspective on the results of treatment and trauma.

K. CAMPBELL, J. GILLANDERS, E. BARRETT, A. MONCARZ


DEN4008Y Pediatric Orthodontics

This 3-year course is designed for pediatric dentistry specialty students. (a) History taking, orthodontic diagnosis, treatment planning (1st year); (b) Clinical orthodontics for pediatric dentistry students (1st, 2nd & 3rd years); (c) Mechanics in orthodontic patient treatment (2nd year); (d) Facial morphology, growth and development - assessment of Burlington data (1st yr).

K. CAMPBELL, P. SECTAKOF, S. CHUNG


DEN4009Y Pediatrics

This is a series of seminars and ward rounds directed by the Department of Pediatrics at the Hospital for Sick Children. A study of growth and development from birth to adulthood is presented, stressing normal values as well as causes and effects of deviations from them. This course runs concurrently with DEN4010Y and major topic areas are reinforced through patient presentations during ward rounds. Major infections are reviewed as to etiology, clinical manifestations and treatment, and current immunization procedures are presented. Tumors of a benign or malignant nature which are common to the pediatric age group are discussed as to clinical aspects and current therapies, and common bleeding disorders are described, with emphasis on management and relevance to dental practice. The aspects of cardiac disease in childhood are presented as well as related prophylactic measures in current use in dental practice. A lecture on basic genetics is given as to modes of inheritance, chromosomal abnormalities and methods of investigation. At the Hospital for Sick Children, patients are presented who represent some of the subjects discussed in the lecture series, thereby enhancing the latter through clinical illustrations.

K. CAMPBELL, M. WEINSTEIN, PEDIATRICS, HOSP. FOR SICK CHILDREN
 

DEN4010Y Pediatric Medicine & Hospital Dentistry

This seminar course has emphasis on examination of the scientific evidence supporting contemporary practice.  The pediatric dentistry graduate student will gain understanding of what being a member of hospital staff entails, principles of management of dental disease under general anesthesia, medical management of a variety of co-morbidities to support their caring for the oral health of children.  Topics addressed include:  oro-facial wound healing, hematological diseases, cardiovascular disease, liver disease, renal disease, common syndromes & those with craniofacial malformations, dermatological diseases, disorders of muscular function, metabolic and endocrine disorders, children with medical devices, childhood cancers, respiratory diseases, neurological disorders, allergy, immunodeficiency, infectious diseases, obesity & eating disorders, pregnancy and substance abuse. Additionally, the course will inform clinical decision-making, incorporating the added complexity of developing a comprehensive treatment plan for the pediatric patient with special health care needs. It will also discuss the issues surrounding palliative and end-of-life management of oral pain/disease.

K. CAMPBELL
 

DEN4011Y Conscious Sedation and Anesthesia in Pediatric Dentistry

The pharmacological management of a child’s behavior is a core clinical requirement for the clinical specialty of pediatric dentistry, as is the management of children and patients with special needs under general anesthesia. This seminar course provides in-depth understanding of the pharmacokinetics of nitrous oxide-oxygen analgesia, oral moderate sedation adjuncts and patient management under deep sedation and general anaesthesia. Students must successfully complete Pediatric Advanced Cardiac Life Support (PALS) and Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) as pre-requisite courses for oral moderate sedation, non-intubated and intubated general anesthesia clinics.

K. CAMPBELL, P. COPP

 

DEN4012Y ‚Äď Clinical Pediatric Dentistry I

This clinical course comprises the first year of clinical activity in pediatric dentistry. A pre-requisite clinical simulation course is delivered during the orientation period. This is supported by didactic introductory seminars to review basic pediatric restorative dentistry techniques, caries risk assessment and treatment planning, and permits calibration of operative skills. Following successful completion of simulation exercises, the graduate student will be assigned to clinical activity at various sites.  These encompass all clinical aspects related to the practice of the specialty of Pediatric Dentistry. The examination, diagnosis and treatment of the infant and child patient and patients with special health care needs are supervised in the Graduate Pediatric Dentistry Clinic at the University of Toronto and in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at SickKids Hospital. Additional clinical assignments include City of Toronto Public Health Clinic, Mt. Sinai clinic for persons with disabilities and Oral Moderate Sedation clinic in the Pediatric Surgicenter. All graduate students begin participation in after-hours emergency call at SickKids towards the end of the clinical year. Grad students also participate with clinical staff in weekly patient care conferences and chart auditing exercises.

K CAMPBELL AND STAFF, PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY, UT. M. CASAS AND DENTAL STAFF, SickKids Hospital; Mt. Sinai Hospital Dental Clinic Staff



DEN4013Y ‚Äď Clinical Pediatric Dentistry II

This clinical course comprises the second year of clinical activity in pediatric dentistry. The graduate student will be assigned to clinical activity at various sites.  These encompass all clinical aspects related to the practice of the specialty of Pediatric Dentistry. The examination, diagnosis and treatment of the infant and child patient and patients with special health care needs are supervised in the Graduate Pediatric Dentistry Clinic at the University of Toronto and in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at SickKids Hospital. Additional clinical assignments include City of Toronto Public Health Clinic, Mt. Sinai operating room for persons with disabilities. Graduate students will rotate to the Pediatric Surgicenter on a regular basis in this second year to participate in dental rehabilitation using non-intubated and intubated general anesthesia and in Oral Moderate Sedation clinic. All graduate students participate in after-hours emergency call at SickKids towards the end of the clinical year. A mandatory rotation in anesthesia will be assigned during the second or third year. Grad students also participate with clinical staff in weekly patient care conferences and chart auditing exercises.

 K CAMPBELL AND STAFF, PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY, UT. M. CASAS AND DENTAL STAFF, SickKids Hospital; Mt. Sinai Hospital Dental Clinic Staff

 

 

DEN5001Y Graduate Endodontics Case Presentations

 

This weekly three-year seminar series is intended to discuss clinical cases, recently diagnosed, currently under treatment or already treated. The cases are presented by the endodontics graduate students in accordance with a specific schedule, with three cases normally presented in any given session. Presentations follow a standardized format, and include all pre-operative and intra-operative information pertaining to the presented cases. Information on anamnesis and clinical and radiographic findings is presented to form the basis for differential diagnosis, treatment planning and projection of prognosis. Information on treatment procedures performed is then presented using radiographic and photographic visual aids. The presentation is concluded with discussion of learning points and critique of the treated case provided by the presenting student. Diagnostic and therapeutic steps are to be supported by relevant evidence. The presentation is open to discussion and critique by attending students and staff.

 

Course components include use of Power Point for case presentation, citation of evidence supporting diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and critique of all steps and procedures related to the treated case. Graded components of the course include (1) quality and interpretation of radiographs, (2) appropriate use of evidence base, and (3) critique of the case. The cumulative grades for each of components (1) and (2) amount to 35% of the annual grade, whereas the cumulative grades for component (3) amount to 30% of the annual grade. A grade for the course is assigned at the end of each academic year.

 

This course is designed to enhance and amplify the students‚Äô scope of clinical experiences by sharing experiences from cases treated by others. The discussion also provides an opportunity for exposure to other opinions than those provided by the clinic instructors during the treatment of the presented cases, further expanding the scope of the clinical experiences. Finally, the emphasis on providing evidence for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures is designed to enhance the culture of ‚Äúevidence-based healthcare‚ÄĚ and its application in the context of endodontic treatment. Participation in this course is a program requirement.

 

B. BASRANI, STAFF


   DEN5002Y Graduate Endodontics Topical Literature

 

This weekly two-year seminar series reviews the historic and principle literature that provides the basis for understanding of endodontic disease and its treatment. The scientific literature identified as being important to the field is critically reviewed and key concepts are established. Specific areas reviewed include the (i) development, structure and pathophysiology of the dental pulp and periapical tissues, (ii) causes, prevention, and management of endodontic post-treatment disease (treatment failure), (iii) effects and management of traumatic injury to the developing and developed permanent dentition, (iv) evolution and testing of methods and materials for root canal preparation and filling, (v) long-term outcomes of endodontic treatment, (vi) considerations for post-treatment restoration, (vii) benefits and risks associated with internal bleaching, and (viii) several clinical topics.  An extensive reading list and the oral presentation of selected articles on assigned topics constitute the course requirement. The series is a continuum spanning two years. Students enter the course in the beginning or in the middle in alternating years.

 

Course components include (1) reading of assigned literature, (2) participation in the discussion of the assigned literature, (3) presentation of the summaries of selected assigned articles, (4) preparation and presentation of entire seminars on selected topics. There is no percentage value allocated to the course components. A grade for this course is assigned based on performance in a final examination.

 

This course is designed to provide the biological foundation for endodontic therapy. Acquiring knowledge about this foundation is essential for education of specialists in the field of Endodontics. Participation in this course is a program requirement.

 

B. BASRANI, STAFF
 

 

DEN5003Y Graduate Endodontics Current Literature

 

 

This weekly three-year seminar series reviews the current publications pertaining to endodontics. Using comprehensive on-line search strategies, current publications related to each of 15 themes are identified. Selected journal articles on each theme are assigned to students for review. Each seminar session addresses either one of the 15 themes in accordance with a structured schedule. Few sessions are also spent to review the recent position statements and miscellaneous topics of current interest. The students submit a review on their assigned articles comprising a summary and critique, both in writing for archiving purposes and verbally during the seminars. The seminars are moderated by graduate endodontics staff members who provide the context for the impact of the reviewed articles on the body of knowledge related to each theme.

Course components include reading of assigned articles, submission of written summaries and critique of articles, submission of two multiple-choice questions for each article, presentation of the summary and critique during the seminar, and use of cross references to provide context for the reviewed article. Graded components of the course include (1) thoroughness of cross-referencing, and (2) critique of the article. The cumulative grades for each component amount to 20% of the final grade. An examination at the end of each academic term (December and June) amounts to the remaining 80% of the course grade for that year.

This course is designed to help the students develop the necessary skills for critical reading of the scientific literature, while also acquiring knowledge of the most current advances in most areas of endodontic research. Participation in this course is a program requirement.

 A. KISHEN, STAFF
 

DEN5004Y Single Tooth Replacements with implant supported Prosthesis

 

This course is designed to provide formal education and training for students enrolled in the MSc Endodontic program in the field of Implant Dentistry, with specific focus on the replacement of a single tooth with an implant-supported prosthesis. The course consists of three modules designed to provide formal didactic, preclinical and clinical exposure in both the surgical and prosthetic phases of implant treatment.

 

  1. SHRESTHA, J. LAI, STAFF

 

 

DEN5005F Introduction to Graduate Endodontics

 

Students entering the MSc program in Endodontics are all dentists who have had different educational and clinical experiences. Before these students can begin treating patients, they have to increase their theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to a level expected of the specialty student. This course is designed to achieve that goal by combining the basic theoretical knowledge with hands on practice on extracted teeth.

 

B. BASRANI, STAFF

 

 

DEN999Y1 Dental Resident Seminars

 

This course represents the didactic component of the Hospital Dental Residency Programme at the University of Toronto. Seminars are held biweekly from July through May. The course consists of a core block of lectures that will help prepare all residents to diagnose and provide basic treatment to dental patients in the hospital acute care setting, provide dental care to medically-compromised pediatric, adult and geriatric patients, and identify and manage various pathologic entities of the head and neck. The course also includes lecture blocks specific to the individual educational objectives of the programme’s three training sites, including the safe administration of parenteral conscious sedation to dental patients and the dental and surgical management of the cleft-craniofacial patient. City Wide Rounds are held biannually where residents present and discuss interesting clinical cases with faculty and peers. Credit for this course will be based on seminar attendance and participation. This is a credit/non-credit based course.

J. DAVIS
 

PDE9094Y Clinical Conferences

 

This is a seminar series with compulsory attendance for all graduate clinical students (except those in Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology & Oral Medicine specialty). Groups comprising two or three residents from different specialty programs are assigned to work together to present formal one-hour seminars. Topics of presentation should be multidisciplinary, related to current clinical issues in the individual specialty fields, evidenced-based, and serve to keep attendees abreast of current treatment philosophy in specialties other than their own. Credit for the course is based on a required minimum number of attendance. For those assigned to present, in addition to meeting attendance requirements, credit is based on the seminar presentation and submission of a written report of the case presentation to a journal. (This is a credit/ non-credit course).

 

 M.GLOGAUER, STAFF
 

Description of Degree Programs (M.Sc./ Ph.D.) with Advanced Dental Specialty Training

 

The following symbols are used in all Specialty Program Descriptions, which follow:

 

*   Indicates courses offered in alternate years.

¬ę Indicates courses which may continue over a program, and which are graded when completed. y ¬†Indicates a course that may be substituted by an equivalent course offered by another Faculty.


Dental Anaesthesia

 

Graduate Specialty Program Director

 

Dr.  M. Wong

 

The principle objective of this program is to prepare the dentist to provide the full range of sedation and anaesthetic techniques for dental patients with the focus on deep sedation and general anaesthesia. An additional objective is to train clinicians to be able to undertake teaching and research in dental anaesthesia. The teaching facilities for this program are provided by the combined resources of Dental Anaesthesia in the Faculty of Dentistry and the Department of Anaesthesia, Faculty of Medicine. Training is given both at the Faculty and at teaching hospitals associated with the University. Clinical anaesthesia training includes 12 months at the Faculty, 8 months at Michael Garron Hospital (MGH) and 2 months at the Hospital for Sick Children. Additional clinical training includes rotations in internal medicine, respirology, cardiology, and orofacial pain. Students are expected to participate in a range of clinical teaching experiences, including undergraduate, continuing education, and peer teaching.  The precise timing of the research component can vary and will be incorporated into the schedule on an individual basis. Each student is required to complete an ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) course in Year I and PALS (Pediatric Advanced Cardiac Life Support) in Year II. Currency in ACLS and PALS certification is mandatory during the registration period. The following is an outline of the program.

 

YEAR I

First term

Research Ethics (DEN1010H)

 

Introduction to Biostatistics (DEN1015H)

Basic Principles of Anaesthesia (DEN1055H) Basic Concepts in Clinical Medicine (DEN1056Y)

Dental Anaesthesia Graduate Seminars (DEN1073Y)

 

Foundations of Medicine as Applied to Dental Anaesthesia (DEN1074Y) General Anaesthesia for Medical Procedures ‚Äď Adult I (DEN1076H) General Anaesthesia for Dental Procedures ‚Äď Adult I (DEN1078H) Experiences in Clincal Teaching I (DEN1084H)

Fundamentals of Dental Anaesthesia I (DEN1087Y)

 

Research (RST9999Y)
 

Second Term

 

Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Care (DEN1014H) Basic Concepts in Clinical Medicine (DEN1056Y)

Dental Anaesthesia Graduate Seminars (DEN1073Y)

Foundations of Medicine as Applied to Dental Anaesthesia (DEN1074Y)

General Anaesthesia for Medical Procedures ‚Äď Adult I (DEN1076H) General Anaesthesia for Dental Procedures ‚Äď Adult I (DEN1078H) Experiences in Clinical Teaching I (DEN1084H)

Fundamentals of Dental Anaesthesia I (DEN1087Y) Research (RST9999Y)

YEAR II

 

First term

 

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y)

 

General Anaesthesia for Medical Procedures ‚Äď Pediatric (DEN1052Y)

Medical Anaesthesia Seminars I (DEN1071H)

 

Experiences in Clinical Medicine (DEN1083Y)

Experiences in Clinical Teaching II (DEN1085H) Fundamentals of Dental Anaesthesia II (DEN1088Y) Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y)

Research (RST9999Y) or Research Practicum (DEN1061H)

 

Second Term
 

As in first term

 

YEAR III

 

First term

 

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y)

 


Medical Anaesthesia Seminars II (DEN1072Y)

 

General Anaesthesia for Dental Procedures ‚Äď Pediatric (DEN1075Y)

 

General Anaesthesia for Medical Procedures ‚Äď Adult II (DEN1077H)

 

General Anaesthesia for Dental Procedures ‚Äď Adult II ¬ę (DEN1079H) Experiences in Clinical Teaching III (DEN1086H)

Fundamentals of Dental Anaesthesia III (DEN1089Y)

Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y)

Research (RST9999Y) or Research Practicum (DEN1061H)

 

Second Term

 

As in first term

 

Electives ‚Äď May be arranged according to the student‚Äôs interest or at the discretion of the Graduate Program Director. Elective experiences may include topics such as Emergency Medicine, Acute Care/Resuscitation, Respirology, Cardiology, and Orofacial Pain.

 

Other courses can be arranged according to the student’s interest through the Graduate Program

Director or Graduate Chair.

 

Dental Public Health

 

Graduate Specialty Program Director

 

Dr. C. Qui√Īonez

 

 

This program normally consists of a core of subjects taken in the first year and second year, with optional subjects chosen by students in consultation with the Director of the Program. The practicum is generally conducted in the months between first and second year. Courses are given by the Faculty of Dentistry and by other university units such as the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation. The following is an outline of the program curriculum. Other courses can be arranged according to the student's interest through the Director of the Program or the Associate Dean of Graduate Education. The program is also offered on a part-time basis. Part-time students have up to five years to complete all requirements. However, part-time students are not permitted to transfer to the PhD program.

 

YEAR I

 

First Term

 

Introduction to Public Health Sciences (CHL5004H)

Preventive Dentistry (DEN1003H)

 

Dental Public Health Seminars (DEN1006Y)

 

Research Ethics (DEN1010H)

 

Introduction to Biostatistics (DEN1015H) Oral Epidemiology (DEN1051Y)

Practicum in Dental Public Health (DEN1063Y)

Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y)

 

Thesis/Research (RST9999Y)
Second Term

Dental Public Health Seminars (DEN1006Y)

 

Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Care (DEN1014H) Oral Epidemiology (DEN1051Y)

Practicum in Dental Public Health (DEN1063Y)
Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y)
Thesis/Research (RST9999Y)

YEAR II

 

First Term

 

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y)

 

Approved Option I: Health Policy or Health Economics

 

Approved Option II

Thesis/Research (RST9999Y)
Second Term

 

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y)

 

Management Principles in Canadian Dental Health Organizations (DEN1064H)

Thesis/Research (RST9999Y)

 

 

 

 

 

Endodontics

 

 

Graduate Specialty Program Director

 

Dr. B.R. Basrani

 

The graduate Endodontics program is designed to provide students with opportunities to acquire excellent clinical skills and comprehension of the underlying biology. Its components include (i) patient care, providing all aspects of endodontic treatment, (ii) topic-specific and current literature seminars, (iii) clinical conferences, (iv) core curriculum courses, (v) rotation programs (when available), (vi) research at the M.Sc. level, including application for funding, preparation of manuscripts for publication, presentation at national and international research forums, and (vii) guest lectures. Great emphasis is placed on self-learning in all of the program’s components. Students are encouraged to identify research topics, related to endodontic science or any other dental or non-dental scientific area. Through continual updating of courses and research schedules, the program aims to achieve a balanced platform of excellent specialty education and committed service to patients. Students are encouraged to join the Ontario Society of Endodontists, the Canadian Academy of Endodontics and the American Association of Endodontists.

The following is an outline of the program curriculum (changes may occur according to availability of courses, particularly those offered every other year):

 

YEAR I

 

First Term

 

Anatomy (DEN3005H)

 

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (DEN1007F) Research Ethics (DEN1010H)

Introduction to Biostatistics (DEN1015H)
 

Inhalation and Oral Minimal and Moderate Sedation for Dental Procedures (DEN1090H) Graduate Endodontics Case Presentations (DEN5001Y)

Graduate Endodontics Topical Literature (DEN5002Y) Graduate Endodontics Current Literature (DEN5003Y) Introduction to Graduate Endodontics (DEN5005H) Endodontic Clinic (PDE9091Y)

Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y) Research (RST9999Y)

Second Term

 

Oral Pathology (DEN1002S)

 

Cone Beam CT Imaging (DEN1008S) - optional

 

Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Care (DEN1014H) Pharmacology of Dental Therapeutics (DEN1062H)
Advances in Dental Materials Sciences (DEN1070H)*

Graduate Endodontics Case Presentations (DEN5001Y)

 

Graduate Endodontics Topical Literature (DEN5002Y)

 

Graduate Endodontics Current Literature (DEN5003Y)

 

Endodontic Clinic (PDE9091Y)

 

Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y)

 

Research (RST9999Y)

 

Teaching (in the undergraduate preclinical endodontics course).

 


  YEAR II

 

First Term

 

Investigating Pathogenic Biofilms (DEN1022H)

 

Oral Physiology: Sensory & Neuromuscular Function (DEN1060F) Graduate Endodontics Case Presentations (DEN5001Y)

Graduate Endodontics Topical Literature (DEN5002Y) Graduate Endodontics Current Literature (DEN5003Y)

Single Tooth Replacement with Implant Supported Prosthesis (DEN5004Y) Endodontic Clinic (PDE9091Y)

Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y) Research (RST9999Y)

Second Term

Advances in Dental Materials Sciences (DEN1070H)* (if not taken in year 1)

 

Graduate Endodontics Case Presentations (DEN5001Y) Graduate Endodontics Topical Literature (DEN5002Y) Graduate Endodontics Current Literature (DEN5003Y)
Single Tooth Replacement with Implant Supported Prosthesis (DEN5004Y)
Endodontic Clinic (PDE9091Y)

Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y)

 

Teaching (in the undergraduate preclinical endodontics course) Research (RST9999Y)

YEAR III
First Term

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y) Toronto Public Health dental clinic rotation

Graduate Endodontics Case Presentations (DEN5001Y)

 

Graduate Endodontics Current Literature (DEN5003Y)
Single Tooth Replacement with Implant Supported Prosthesis (DEN5004Y)
Endodontic Clinic (PDE9091Y)

Research (RST9999Y)

 

 

Second Term

 

Master’s Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y) Toronto Public Health dental clinic rotation

Graduate Endodontics Case Presentations (DEN5001Y)

 

Graduate Endodontics Current Literature (DEN5003Y)
Single Tooth Replacement with Implant Supported Prosthesis (DEN5004Y)
Endodontic Clinic (PDE9091Y)

Research (RST9999Y)

 

Teaching (in the undergraduate preclinical endodontics course)
 

Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology and Oral Medicine

 

 

Graduate Specialty Program Director

 

Dr. G. Bradley

 

Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology and Oral Medicine are separate programs, both of which lead to eligibility for the National Dental Specialty Examinations administered by the National Dental Examining Board of Canada and the Fellowship Examinations of the Royal College of Dentists of Canada. Accreditation requirements specify a ‚Äúcore‚ÄĚ program common to both programs, which allows both Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine to be completed in four years. Oral Medicine and Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology each takes three years and may be taken independently. Each may be a customized program of study and research. Preference is normally given to candidates who wish to pursue the combined program.

 

An M.Sc. (Oral Medicine) or M.Sc. (Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology) is awarded for an independent program or M.Sc. (Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology and Oral Medicine) for those completing the combined program.

 

YEAR I

 

First Term

 

General and Special Pathology for Residents (LMP1300Y) ‚Ēľ

 

Second Term

 

General and Special Pathology for Residents (LMP1300Y) ‚Ēľ
 

YEAR II

 

First Term

 

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (DEN1007F) Research Ethics (DEN1010H)

Seminars in Advanced Oral Pathology (DEN1011Y)

 

Oral Medicine (DEN1012Y)

 

Oral Surgical Pathology (DEN1013Y) Introduction to Biostatistics (DEN1015H) Research (RST9999Y)

Second Term

 

Full year courses as in First Term

 

Oral Pathology (DEN1002S)

 

Cone Beam CT Imaging (DEN1008S) - optional

 

Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Care (DEN1014H)

YEAR III

 

First Term and Second Term

 

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y) Seminars in Advanced Oral Pathology (DEN1011Y)

Oral Medicine (DEN1012Y)

 

Oral Surgical Pathology (DEN1013Y) Research (RST9999Y)

YEAR IV

 

Seminars in Advanced Oral Pathology (DEN1011Y) Oral Medicine (DEN1012Y)

Oral Surgical Pathology (DEN1013Y)

Research (RST9999Y)

 

Other courses may be arranged according to the student’s interest by the Head of the Program or the

Chair of the Graduate Department.

 

‚Ēľ Completed by M.Sc. (Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology) and M.Sc. (Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology & Medicine).

 

 

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology

 

Graduate Specialty Program Director

 

Dr. E. Lam

 

The graduate Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology program stresses the prescription and analysis of images to diagnose abnormalities of the craniofacial region.

 

The clinical program provides extensive experience in intra- and extra-oral radiography, sialography, multidetector and cone beam computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging through patient contact in either the Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology clinic in the Faculty of Dentistry, or in one of the associated teaching hospitals. Intensive didactic courses in oral and maxillofacial pathology together with seminars relating the relevant foundational sciences underpinning disease pathogenesis to radiologic appearances provide an understanding of the mechanisms by which pathologic conditions alter the appearances of normal tissues depicted

on radiologic images. Radiology rounds conducted with medical radiology residents highlight the use of advanced imaging to diagnose abnormalities of the head and neck. Radiation biology and physics, biostatistics and epidemiology, disorders of the temporomandibular joints and experience in undergraduate teaching are also integral components of the program.

 

An M.Sc. or Ph.D. degree is also completed as part of the research component of the program. This involves the identification of a basic scientific, clinical or educational research topic identified by the graduate student as an area of interest. The research project is further refined in collaboration with a faculty member, and the work is examined in the form of a written thesis and oral defense.

 

Successful completion of the program entitles the student to challenge both the National Dental Specialty Examination administered by the Royal College of Dentists of Canada, leading to Fellowship in the College, and the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology examination.
 

The following is an outline of the program curriculum:

 

YEAR I

 

First Term

 

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y) Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (DEN1007F)

Research Ethics (DEN1010H)

 

Oral Surgical Pathology (DEN1013Y)
Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology I (DEN1094Y) Craniofacial Anatomy & Osteology (DEN2008Y)
Research (RST9999Y)

Mi Applied Physics modules (http://www.miappliedphysics.com)

Second Term

 

As in first term plus

 

Physics of Radiology ‚Äď Part I

Oral Pathology (DEN1002S) Temporomandibular Disorders* (DEN1017S)

YEAR II

First Term

 

Oral Surgical Pathology (DEN1013Y)
Introduction to Biostatistics (DEN1015H)
Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology II (DEN1095Y)
Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y)

Research (RST9999Y)

 

Mi Applied Physics modules (http://www.miappliedphysics.com)

 

Second Term

 

As in first term plus

 

Clinical and Experimental Radiobiology

 

Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Care (DEN1014H)
Temporomandibular Disorders* (DEN1017S) (if not taken in year 1)

YEAR III

 

Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology III (DEN1096Y)

 

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y) Research/Thesis (RST9999Y)

 

 

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

 

 

Graduate Specialty Program Director

 

Dr. M. Caminiti

 

The program in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is a minimum of four years (48 months) in length to satisfy the completion of didactic and clinical requirements as well as those of the M.Sc. degree.   Clinical activities are based primarily at Mt. Sinai Hospital, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Humber River Hospital, and Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital. There is also additional participation at other University of Toronto Affiliated Teaching centres: The Hospital for Sick Children, Rouge Valley Health Network, Trillium Health (Mississauga), Thunder Bay Regional Hospital, and Hotel Dieu Grace Healthcare (Windsor).  

 

Residents participate in all areas of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with increasing responsibilities for patient care in a graduated fashion. There is also a strong component of clinic care within the faculty of Dentistry with teaching opportunities to undergraduate students.  The junior resident (PGY1) is focused primarily on patient care and outpatient clinic management with assistance in the operating room. The sophomore resident (PGY2) is an off-service rotation with 12 months of clinical rotations in General Surgery, Trauma Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Anesthesiology, Plastic Surgery and Head and Neck Surgery. The senior resident (PGY3) is responsible for management of the operating rooms and developing surgical skills. The final Chief Resident year (PGY4) demands a leadership role in coordinating the 36 operating rooms days per month and the 42 clinic days per month. In PGY4, external electives may be arranged (to a maximum of one month) in craniofacial surgery, head and neck surgery, reconstructive surgery, cleft lip and palate surgery, cosmetic surgery and maxillofacial trauma. ACLS training is to be completed prior to commencement of Year III, ATLS training must be completed before the end of Year IV.  The OMS Program is associated with TAAAC (Toronto Addis Ababa Academic Collaborative) and Face the Future Foundation for educational and surgical training of OMS colleagues in Ethiopia every fall. Participation in Northern Clinic visits as an outreach of the Craniofacial Program at Holland Bloorview is also available.

 

A requirement of the Faculty of Dentistry is the registration into the School of Graduate Studies and the obtaining of a Master’s of Science Degree. This needs to be an original study in either clinical, epidemiological, education or laboratory research and undertaken according to the residents’ interest and the availability of a graduate research committee. The research must be published in a comprehensive thesis and supported by an oral defense. The research component is a key element in the complete education of a surgical resident and dedicated time and support is provided for this endeavour.

 

 

 

The following is the outline of the curriculum:

 

YEAR I

 

First Term

 

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y)
Principles of Surgery (Faculty of Medicine; Surgical Skills Centre)

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (DEN1007F)

Research Ethics (DEN1010H)

 

Oral Surgical Pathology (DEN1013Y) Surgical Orthodontics (DEN2005Y)

OMFS 1 - The Physiological Basis of Disease (DEN3001Y)
OMFS 2 - Principles and Practice of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (DEN3002Y)

 

OMFS 3 - Evidence-based Literature Reviews in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (DEN3003Y)

 

OMFS 4 - Applied Surgical Anatomy of the Head and Neck (DEN3004Y)

 

Anatomy (DEN3005H)

 

Clinical Conference (PDE9094Y) Research (RST9999Y)

Second Term

 

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y) Oral Pathology (DEN1002S)

Cone Beam CT Imaging (DEN1008S) - optional

Oral Surgical Pathology (DEN1013Y)

 

Surgical Orthodontics (DEN2005Y)

 

OMFS 1 - The Physiological Basis of Disease (DEN3001Y)

 

OMFS 2 - Principles and Practice of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (DEN3002Y)

 

OMFS 3 - Evidence-based Literature Reviews in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (DEN3003Y) Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y)

Research (RST9999Y)

 

YEAR II

 

First Term

 

Introduction to Biostatistics (DEN1015H)

OMFS 1 - The Physiological Basis of Disease (DEN3001Y)

 

OMFS 2 - Principles and Practice of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (DEN3002Y)

 

OMFS 3 - Evidence-based Literature Reviews in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (DEN3003Y) Research (RST9999Y)

CLINICAL ROTATIONS
 

Anaesthesia ‚Äď 3 months (Adult), 1 month (Pediatric); Internal Medicine - 2 months; Emergency Medicine

- 1 month; General Surgery - 2 months; Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery - 2 months; ICU - 1 month; Craniofacial Surgery ‚Äď 1 month

 

Second Term

 

As in first term with the addition of:

 

 

YEAR III

 

First Term

 

Oral Surgical Pathology (DEN1013Y) Surgical Orthodontics (DEN2005Y)

OMFS 1 - The Physiological Basis of Disease (DEN3001Y)

 

OMFS 2 - Principles and Practice of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (DEN3002Y)

 

OMFS 3 - Evidence-based Literature Reviews in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (DEN3003Y)


OMFS 4 - Applied Surgical Anatomy of the Head and Neck (DEN3004Y)

 

Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y)

 

Research (RST9999Y)

 

YEAR IV

 

First and Second Term

 

Surgical Orthodontics (DEN2005Y)

 

OMFS 1 - The Physiological Basis of Disease (DEN3001Y)

 

OMFS 2 - Principles and Practice of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (DEN3002Y)

 

OMFS 3 - Evidence-based Literature Reviews in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (DEN3003Y)

Research/Thesis (RST9999Y)

 

 

Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics

 

 

Graduate Specialty Program Director

 

Dr. S. Suri

 

The mission of the graduate specialty program in Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics is to graduate orthodontists who have the scientific training and clinical skills to make evidence based treatment decisions and provide excellent clinical orthodontic care together with a research experience that ensures the ability to critically evaluate the literature and the desire to be life-long learners.

The specific objectives are to:

a)   Provide a strong educational background in science and investigatory methodology so that decisions in clinical care are evidence based and patient centered. 

b)   Provide research and teaching experiences that are formulated on the principles and procedures that have biological and scientific validity.

c)   Provide the evaluation and information retrieval skills that are used to critically evaluate the scientific literature and emphasize the principles of an orthodontic career of life-long learning.

d)   Provide the opportunity to interact with other dental care specialties to provide comprehensive care in those patients who require a team approach to their overall care.

e)   Provide the basic training in clinical technique and mechanotherapy and develop the clinical skills that will produce a competent clinician.

The program provides a comprehensive education in orthodontics through a three-year M.Sc. program, through a balance in the major components of the graduate students’ education in orthodontic treatment, didactics, research and research related courses.  The program provides the students dedicated research time throughout the 3 years. 

 

Graduate students must be able to demonstrate adequate background knowledge of the following subjects, which will not be scheduled in the formal curriculum of study: 1) Dental Histology; 2) Preventive Dentistry; and 3) Gross Anatomy. Oral examinations will be held in the first clinical year if the standard of knowledge in any of the above subjects is below that required. Arrangements for a formal course of instruction must be made through the graduate specialty program directors of the programs concerned.

 The following is an outline of the program curriculum:

 

YEAR I

 

First Term
 

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (DEN1007F) Research Ethics (DEN1010H)

Introduction to Biostatistics (DEN1015H)

 

Oral Physiology:  Sensory and Neuromuscular Function (DEN1060F)

 

Orthodontics 1 ‚Äď Advanced Orthodontic Diagnosis and Treatment Planning (DEN2001Y) Surgical Orthodontics (DEN2005Y)

Facial Growth and Facial Analysis (DEN2006Y)

 

Craniofacial Anatomy and Osteology (DEN2008Y)

 

Tissue Reaction to Orthodontic and Orthopedic Forces (DEN2010H) Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y)

Research (RST9999Y)

 

Second Term

 

As in first term with the addition of

               

Cone Beam CT Imaging (DEN1008S) - optional

 

Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Care (DEN1014H)

 

YEAR II

 

First Term

 

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y)

 

Orthodontics 2 ‚Äď Biomechanics, Orthodontic Technique and Practice Administration (DEN2002Y) Surgical Orthodontics (DEN2005Y)

Craniofacial Anomalies (DEN2007Y)*

 

Classic Theories of Craniofacial Growth (DEN2009H) Craniofacial Morphology and Development (DEN2011Y) Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y)

Research (RST9999Y)


Second Term

 

As in first term with the addition of

 

Occlusion: Function and Dysfunction (DEN1016S)* Temporomandibular Disorders (DEN1017S)*

 


 

YEAR III

First Term

 

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y) Orthodontics 3 ‚Äď Ortho Tech & Clin Prac (DEN2003Y) Orthodontics 4 ‚Äď Interceptive Ortho (DEN2004Y)

Surgical Orthodontics (DEN2005Y)
Craniofacial Anomalies (DEN2007Y)* (if not taken in year 2)
Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y)
Research (RST9999Y)

Second Term

 

As in first term plus

 

Occlusion: Function and Dysfunction (DEN1016S)* (if not taken in year 2) Temporormandibular Disorders (DEN1017S)* (if not taken in year 2)

Other courses can be arranged according to the student's interest through the Director of the Program, or Chair of the Graduate Department.

 

*offered in alternate years

 

 


 

 

 

 Pediatric Dentistry

 

 

Graduate Specialty Program Director

 

Dr. K. Campbell

 

The Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto is the oldest fully accredited specialty program in Pediatric Dentistry in Canada. This is a three year program leading to a Master’s of Science Degree with advanced clinical training in all aspects of Pediatric Dentistry. The didactic program is centered at the Faculty of Dentistry, while the clinical program will be divided between the Faculty of Dentistry and The Hospital for Sick Children with additional assigned rotations to Mt. Sinai Hospital and a community-based Toronto Public Health dental clinic. During the program graduate students will manage emergency cases, provide dental rehabilitation under conscious sedation and general anaesthesia,  will provide specialty  consultations,  manage pediatric oral pathology,  oral and maxillofacial surgery, fixed and removable orthodontics and complex restorative cases. In addition, graduate students will be assigned undergraduate teaching responsibilities.  Graduate students are required to complete a Master’s research project during the program Note: curriculum is subject to change to meet the needs of the grad students. Not all courses are offered each year.

The following is an outline of the program curriculum:

 

YEAR I

 

First Term

 

Preventive Dentistry (DEN1003F)

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (DEN1007F) Research Ethics (DEN1010H)

Introduction to Biostatistics (DEN1015H)

 

Inhalation and Oral Minimal and Moderate Sedation for Dental Procedures (DEN1090H)

Craniofacial Anomalies* (DEN2007Y)

Pediatric Dentistry 1 ‚Äď Theory (DEN4001Y)


Pediatric Dentistry 2 ‚Äď Journal Review (DEN4002Y)

 

Pediatric Dentistry 3 ‚Äď Facial and Dental Growth and Development in Pediatric Dentistry (DEN4003Y) Pediatric Dentistry 4 ‚Äď Child Behaviour Management (DEN4004H)

 

 

Pediatric Dentistry 6 ‚Äď Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery as it Applies to Pediatric Dentistry (DEN4006Y) Pediatric Dentistry 7 ‚Äď Pulp Therapy and Trauma (DEN4007H)

Pediatric Orthodontics (DEN4008Y)
Pediatrics (DEN4009Y)

Pediatric Dentistry 9 ‚Äď Paediatric Medicine and Hospital Dentistry (DEN4010Y)
Pediatric Dentistry 8 ‚Äď Conscious Sedation and Anaesthesia in Pediatric Dentistry (DEN4011Y)

Clinical Pediatric Dentistry I (DEN4012Y) (to replace DEN4005Y)

Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y) Research (RST9999Y)

Second Term

 

Oral Pathology (DEN1002S)

 

Cone Beam CT Imaging (DEN1008S) - optional

 

Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Care (DEN1014H)

 

Pharmacology of Dental Therapeutics (DEN1062H) (Audit)

 

Pediatric Dentistry 1 ‚Äď Theory (DEN4001Y)

 

Pediatric Dentistry 2 ‚Äď Journal Review (DEN4002Y)

 

Pediatric Dentistry 3 ‚Äď Facial and Dental Growth and Development in Pediatric Dentistry (DEN4003Y) Pediatric Dentistry 4 ‚Äď Child Behaviour Management (DEN4004H)

 

 

Pediatric Dentistry 6 ‚Äď Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery as it Applies to Pediatric Dentistry (DEN4006Y) Pediatric Dentistry 7 ‚Äď Pulp Therapy and Trauma (DEN4007H)

Pediatric Orthodontics (DEN4008Y)

 

Pediatrics (DEN4009Y)

 

Pediatric Dentistry 9 ‚Äď Paediatric Medicine and Hospital Dentistry (DEN4010Y)
Pediatric Dentistry 8 ‚Äď Conscious Sedation and Anaesthesia in Pediatric Dentistry (DEN4011Y)

Clinical Pediatric Dentistry I (DEN4012Y) (to replaceDEN4005Y)

Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y) Research (RST9999Y)

Third Term

 

Pediatric Dentistry 1 ‚Äď Theory (DEN4001Y) Pediatric Dentistry 2 ‚Äď Journal Review (DEN4002Y)

Clinical Pediatric Dentistry I (DEN4012Y) ‚Äď (to replace DEN4005Y)
Research (RST9999Y)

YEAR II

First Term

 

Craniofacial Anomalies* (DEN2007Y) (if not taken in year 1)
Pediatric Dentistry 1 ‚Äď Theory (DEN4001Y)
Pediatric Dentistry 2 ‚Äď Journal Review (DEN4002Y)

 

Pediatric Orthodontics (DEN4008Y)

Clinical Pediatric Dentistry II (DEN4013Y) (to replaceDEN4005Y)

 

Clinical Conferences (PDE9094Y) Research (RST9999Y)

Second Term

 

Dental Materials Science (DEN1070H)*

Pediatric Dentistry 1 ‚Äď Theory (DEN4001Y)

Pediatric Dentistry 2 ‚Äď Journal Review (DEN4002Y)

 


Pediatric Orthodontics (DEN4008Y)

Clinical Pediatric Dentistry II (DEN4013Y) (to replaceDEN4005Y)

Research (RST9999Y)

 

Third Term

 

Pediatric Dentistry 1 ‚Äď Theory (DEN4001Y) Pediatric Dentistry 2 ‚Äď Journal Review (DEN4002Y)

 

Clinical Pediatric Dentistry II (DEN4013Y) (to replaceDEN4005Y)

 

Research (RST9999Y)

YEAR III

 

First Term

 

Seminars in Oral Health Sciences (DEN1001Y/DEN1100Y) Pediatric Dentistry 1 ‚Äď Theory (DEN4001Y)

Pediatric Dentistry 2 ‚Äď Journal Review (DEN4002Y)

 

Pediatric Dentistry 5 ‚Äď Clinical Pediatric Dentistry (DEN4005Y) Pediatric Orthodontics (DEN4008Y)

Clinical Pediatric Dentistry III (DEN4014Y) (to replaceDEN4005Y
Research (RST9999Y)

 

Second Term

 

As in first term with the addition of:
Dental Materials Science (DEN1070H)* (if not taken in year 2)
*offered in alternate years

 

 

 

 

Periodontics

 

 

Graduate Specialty Program Director

 

Dr. V. Mendes

 

The degree program in Periodontics at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto is designed to provide graduate residents with advanced dental specialty training in periodontics and implantology. It is a minimum three-year program that generally accepts up to 3 residents per year. Successful candidat