FACULTY CALENDAR 2021-22

Doctor of Dental Surgery

For prospective students

Find out more about the Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) in our prospective students area.

Note: The regulations in the Academic Rules and Regulations section of this Calendar apply to students in the D.D.S. program.

Admission information

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is the degree to which a candidate is admitted upon the completion of undergraduate education in Dentistry. It is recognized by dental licensing boards as evidence of graduation, although it does not of itself confer the right to practice Dentistry (See section on Certificate of Registration for Dental Practice in this Calendar.) Dental education is designed to unify the basic and clinical sciences, as it is believed that scientific and professional development cannot be sharply differentiated, but should proceed concurrently throughout the dental program.

Admission requirements

To be eligible for admission into the dentistry program applicants must:

  • Applicants must have completed three years of university education (i.e. at least 15 full year courses or equivalent) by end of May 2021.
  • Complete the following five prerequisite courses by end of May 2021:
  1. One full course (or two half courses) in general biochemistry. This course should cover protein chemistry and the chemistry of other biomolecules, cellular metabolism and molecular biology.
  2. One full course (or two half courses) in general mammalian (human or animal) physiology. This course should cover the following systems: musculoskeletal system; haemostasis mechanisms; haematopoietic system; nervous system; immune system; cardiovascular system; renal physiology; neurophysiology; endocrinology and gastrointestinal physiology.
  3. Two additional full courses (or four half year courses) in Life Sciences (For example - anatomy, biochemistry, biology, botany, genetics, immunology, microbiology, molecular genetics/biology, neuroscience, nutritional sciences, pharmacology, toxicology, physiology, zoology.)
  4. One full course (or two half courses) in a Humanities or Social Science (For example - Humanities: anthropology, art history, classics, East Asian studies, English, history, languages, music, Near and Middle Eastern studies, philosophy. Social Sciences: anthropology, economics, geography, management, political science, religious studies, sociology.)
  • Achieve a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0 (4.0 scale) for all university work. A grade point average of 3.0 (4.0 scale) at the time of application does not, however guarantee selection. It should be noted that in the last several years, the minimum GPA for those interviewed was 3.85* (4.0 scale).

*Note that courses taken in the academic year, during the proposed year of entry will not be included in the calculation of the applicant's cumulative GPA.  Any offer of admission, however, will be contingent upon the successful applicant maintaining an annual GPA of at least 3.0 (4.0 scale) for the current academic year.

*The worst academic year will be dropped from the calculation of an applicant's undergraduate cumulative grade point average provided that (a) the applicant has completed four or more years of university education by May 31st of the proposed year of entry, and (b) the year with the lowest grades is not the applicant's most recently completed year of study.

  • Applicants who are currently completing a graduate program must complete all the requirements of their graduate program including thesis defense by June 30th in their respective application year.
  • Complete the online assessment test CASPer, to assist with our selection process. Successful completion of CASPer is mandatory in order to maintain admission eligibility.

CASPer is an online test, which, assesses for non-cognitive skills and interpersonal characteristics that we believe are important for successful students and graduates of our program, and will complement the other tools that we use for applicant screening. In implementing CASPer, we are trying to further enhance fairness and objectivity in our selection process. 

In order to take CASPer, you will be responsible for securing access to a computer with audio capabilities, a webcam, and a reliable internet connection on your selected test date. CASPer can be taken practically anywhere that you can satisfy the aforementioned requirements. No exceptions will be provided for applicants unable to take CASPer online due to being located at sites where internet is not dependable due to technical or political factors.

Please go to www.takeCASPer.com to sign up for the Canadian Professional Health Sciences test (CSP10201) and reserve a test using one piece of government-issued photo ID. You will be provided with a limited number of testing dates and times. Please note that these are the only testing dates available for your CASPer test. There will be no additional tests scheduled. Please use an email address that you check regularly; there may be updates to the test schedule. The tests for the 2021 admission cycle will be open for registration July 2020.

Please direct any inquiries on the test to support@takecasper.com. Alternatively, you may use the chat bubble in the bottom right hand corner of your screen on the takecasper.com website.

The CASPer test is comprised of 12 sections of video and written scenarios. Following each scenario, you will be required to answer a set of probing questions under a time contract. The test typically takes between 75-90 minutes to complete. Each response is graded by a different rater, giving a very robust and reliable view of personal and professional characteristics important to our program. No studying is required for CASPer, although you may want to familiarize yourself with the test structure at takeCASPer.com, and ensure you have a quiet environment to take the test.

CASPer test results are valid for one admissions cycle. Applicants who have already taken the test in previous years will therefore be expected to re-take it.

    • Write either the Canadian or American Dental Aptitude Test (DAT) and arrange for the test results to be forwarded to the Admissions Office. The Academic Average (AA) and Perceptual Ability Test (PAT) scores are part of the admission process. We do not require applicants to complete the Manual Dexterity (MDT) section of the DAT exam. The DAT must have been taken within the last 24 months at the time of submission of your application. For applicants who have written the DAT exam more than once we will use the highest set of DAT scores. To register for the DAT contact:

The Dental Aptitude Test Program
Canadian Dental Association
1815 Alta Vista Drive
Ottawa, ON K1G 3Y6
Telephone: (613) 523-1770
Email: dat@cda-adc.ca
Web site: www.cda-adc.ca

Dental Admission Testing Program
American Dental Association
211 East Chicago Avenue, Suite 600
Chicago, IL 60611, USA
Telephone: (800) 232-1694
Email: datexam@ada.org
Web site: http://www.ada.org/en/education-careers/dental-admission-test

  • As English is the primary language of instruction and communication at the University of Toronto, applicants must demonstrate an adequate level of proficiency in English, regardless of their citizenship status or country of origin.¬†Applicants from universities outside Canada where English is not the primary language of instruction must provide results of an English language proficiency examination as part of their application. Tests must have been taken¬†within the last 2 years at the time of submission of their application. Acceptable proof of English facility must be submitted by the application deadline (December 1).¬†Official test scores must be sent by the testing agency directly to the University of Toronto. Our institution code is 0982. The following tests are recognized:
  1. Test of English as a Foreign (TOEFL): The Minimum requirement is TOEFL PBT - total score 600 + 5.0 on TWE and for TOEFL IBT - total score 100 + 22 on Writing.
  2. Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB): The minimum requirement is an overall score of 85, with no part below 80.
  3. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic Module: The minimum requirement is an overall band of 6.5, with no band below 6.0.
  4. The Certificate of Proficiency in English (COPE): The minimum requirement is an overall score of 86, with 32 in Writing and 22 in each of the Reading and Listening sections.
  5. Academic Preparation ESL, School of Continuing Studies, University of Toronto: The minimum requirement is a grade of 'B' at the 60/Advanced level.

How to apply

For prospective students

To apply for the Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) - see our prospective students area.

To apply to the Doctor of Dental Surgery program, you must complete an online application form.

You have two paths for application to the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Toronto. You may choose to apply through one of the following online application systems:

  • UTDAS (University of Toronto Dental Application Service); OR,¬†
  • AADSAS (American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Application Service)

In addition to the UTDAS application the following documents must be received by the November 1st application deadline:

  • Non-refundable application service fee of $ 275.00 CDN payable to the University of Toronto. Payment may be made by credit card, or money order. We do not accept personal checks or cash.
  • Proof of citizenship (if applicable), i.e. Canadian citizenship or permanent resident status (photocopy only). This document can be mailed directly, faxed to: (416) 979-4944 or sent via e-mail to: admissions@dentistry.utoronto.ca.
  • Official transcripts of all previous university and other post-secondary education.* Transcripts must be sent to the Admissions office directly from the issuing institution in a sealed envelope. University of Toronto students applying to the dentistry program do not need to send in their official University of Toronto transcripts. We will download them from ROSI.

*Applicants seeking admission on the basis of official documents that are in a language other than English must submit photocopies of their original documents attached to notarized English translations. In addition, applicants must submit a detailed outline of all courses successfully completed in their university program and arrange for an official transcript to be forwarded directly to the Admissions Office from the institution(s) attended by the application deadline.

  • Official DAT score report. Applicants must request original DAT scores to be sent to the Admissions Office directly from the CDA or ADA.
  • Offical CASPer test results. To be sent directly from CASPer (applicants request documents to be sent directly from CASPer)
  • Proof of English facility (if applicable) sent directly by the testing agency to the University of Toronto.¬†
  • Personal statement explaining why you want to pursue a dental career. Do not exceed two pages.
  • Essay outlining what you consider to be your greatest accomplishment and the reasons you have chosen to highlight it. Do not exceed one page. ¬†

International students are eligible to apply to the dentistry program.

Admission documents need to be mailed to the following address:

Admissions Office
Faculty of Dentistry
124 Edward Street, Room 104
Toronto, ON M5G 1G6

Interviews

By early January, each year, shortlisted applicants will be invited for an interview and a tour of the Faculty of Dentistry. Those not invited for interviews will be informed at this time as well. The interviews are held on one weekend in February each year.

Selection and notification of applicants

The selection of applicants is made by the Undergraduate Admission Committee that reports directly to the Council of the Faculty of Dentistry. The criteria for selection are established by the Undergraduate Admission Committee and approved by Faculty Council. Final offers for admission to the IDAPP will be made to selected members of this group of interviewed applicants and will be based upon academic achievement, DAT scores, CASPer test scores, essays and the results of the interview process. In making its decisions the Committee takes all of this information into consideration. By early March, interviewed applicants will be notified by e-mail of the decision made by the Committee with respect to their application.

The decision of the Faculty of Dentistry concerning admission into the Doctor of Dental Surgery is final. No appeal mechanism exists.

A $2,000 (CDN) non-refundable deposit will be required from each applicant granted admission. It will be applied to the fees providing he/she registers.

Indigenous peoples

The Faculty of Dentistry welcomes applications from indigenous peoples (Métis, Status Aboriginal, Non- Status Aboriginal, and Inuit) in recognition of their under-representation in the profession and of the unique contribution that trained members of this group can make. Applications from qualified persons of aboriginal ancestry will receive special consideration for admission.

The Wilson G. Harron Award for Aboriginal Students is available to assist a limited number of students with the financial expenses associated with their dental education.

Applicants who have completed more than one undergraduate university degree

The Faculty of Dentistry will only consider the most recent undergraduate program of study for all applicants who have completed more than one undergraduate university degree.  As well, the worst academic year will be dropped from the calculation of an applicant’s cumulative grade point average provided that (a) the applicant has completed four or more years of university education by May 31st of the proposed year of entry, and (b) the year with the lowest grades is not the applicant’s most recently completed year of study.

Applicants with a communicable disease

All Faculty of Dentistry students are expected to be in a state of health such that they may participate in the academic program, including patient care, without posing a risk to themselves or to others. Students with a communicable disease may pursue their studies only as long as their continued involvement does not pose a health or safety hazard to themselves or others. Such a health or safety hazard, if protracted, may preclude them from participation in clinical work essential to the satisfactory completion of their program of study. The health status of all students shall remain confidential.  Registration status for HBV Carriers remains CONDITIONAL until the Expert Panel on Infectious Diseases reviews their case.

Applicants who have failed in previous university education

Applicants who on two occasions have failed to secure the right to advance to a higher year in their university education and/or who have failed any dental program will normally be refused admission.

Domestic transfer requests

Canadian citizens or permanent residents currently enrolled in an accredited Canadian or U.S. Dental    School who wish to transfer to the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Toronto will be considered for admission, SPACE PERMITTING, into second year (not third or fourth year). Applicants must meet all academic and English facility requirements for admission into first year.  In addition, dental program equivalency with the D.D.S. program at the University of Toronto must be established. Applicants enrolled in Dental Schools where the curriculum is not sufficiently equivalent to allow for direct entry into second year at the University of Toronto are not eligible for transfer consideration. Requests for transfer must be received by the application deadline of June 30, 2020. Documentation must include course descriptions for all dental courses completed by the end of the current academic year. Applicants should be aware that the number of second-year places, if any, varies annually and in most years no spaces are available

Counselling

All incoming students will have the opportunity of orientation counselling to discuss student services, financial assistance, enrolment procedures, housing and other concerns. Appointments may be arranged through the Admissions Office.

Accessibility

Academic accommodations are available to support students registered in Dentistry. For further information, including relevant registration information, please visit the Accessibility Services Website.

Admission deposit

A $2000 CDN non-refundable deposit will be required from each applicant granted admission. It will be applied to the fees providing he/she registers.

Regulations Governing the Doctor of Dental Surgery Degree Program

1. Registration

Detailed instructions concerning Registration will be mailed to returning and newly admitted students before the beginning of each academic year.

On Registration Day, each student must register in person with the Faculty Registrar at the Dental Building. Students are reminded that payment of at least the first installment of their fees to the University Fees Department is an essential part of the registration procedure. Any fees owing from a previous year must be paid before a student will be allowed to register.

A student who fails to register at the appointed time will be required to pay a Late Registration fee of

$44 plus $5 for every additional day. Faculty Council may at its discretion refuse a student permission to register late.

Students who have been registered previously in the Faculty and who have successfully obtained standing in all courses in the preceding year are expected to register in person the following session without preliminary application, unless they notify the Faculty Registrar to the contrary.

2. Student Cards

Students are issued with a permanent U of T Student Smartcard, which serves for the duration of their studies at the University of Toronto. This T-Card provides student identification for academic purposes, student activities and student services; it also serves as a library card and, by its ability to store cash value, can be used to purchase photocopies, computer printing, snacks and beverages at select locations on U of T campuses.  The loss of the Student Card must be reported promptly to the Student Services Office, and the card must be surrendered if a student withdraws from the University or transfers to another Faculty.

3. First aid course and CPR

Students registering in 1st year are required to obtain certification of satisfactory completion of (a) a Canadian Red Cross Society or St. John Ambulance course in First Aid (or its equivalent) and (b) a CPR Basic Rescuer course before they may register in first year of the D.D.S. program. The CPR course must have been completed within the past two years.  All students must present evidence of recertification in the CPR Basic Rescuer course by the last day of classes in 4th year. Certificates verifying completion of such courses must be submitted to the Student Services Office by the last day of classes in the 4th year of the program. The Faculty of Dentistry does not offer instruction in these courses as part of the D.D.S. program.

4. Courses

Students will take all courses and examinations of the program at the times set by the Faculty and under the direction of the Faculty staff. Credit for courses taken elsewhere will only be given as explained in the section entitled Exemptions.

The courses of the curriculum are divided into two categories‚ÄĒdidactic and clinical. ¬†Didactic includes all lectures and some laboratories and preclinical courses. Clinical comprises the preclinical laboratory courses of First and Second Years (Restorative Dentistry, Biomaterials, Orthodontics, Pediatric Dentistry and Prosthodontics) and all clinical work in Third and Fourth Years.

All courses involving technical procedures must be completed in the Faculty laboratories under the direction of the staff in accordance with the regulations laid down by the programs concerned.

5. The University of Toronto Interprofessional Education (IPE) curriculum / program

Interprofessional Education (IPE) occurs when students from two or more professions learn about, from and each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes. Dental students interact with ten other health professional programs (medical radiation sciences, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physician’s assistants, kinesiology and physical education, physical therapy, social work and speech-language pathology) in mandatory and elective activities focused on the development of specific values and core competencies. The knowledge, skills, behaviours and attitudes developed through the IPE curriculum/program will enable students to provide collaborative patient/client-centered care in an interprofessional context.

The learning activities are:

1)         Teamwork: Your Future in Healthcare

2)         Digital Professionalism: Social Media in Healthcare

3)         Roles of Health Professions

4)         Conflict in Interprofessional Life

5)         Case-Based:  Pain Curriculum

6)         IPE Component in a Clinical Placement

7)         2 electives of the student’s choice

Completion of all 7 of the activities above is mandatory to graduate from the DDS program. 

Dentistry

Successful completion of two elective learning activities is required across the four year program.

6. Attendance and absences

The Faculty of Dentistry monitors all absences from the Faculty. It is expected that all students will be in attendance during the entire academic school year.  Attendance at lectures, clinics and laboratories may be considered by program or course directors in the evaluation of a student's performance.  All absences must be reported promptly to the Student Services Office. Students must not permit appointments with patients to conflict with lectures, laboratory classes or demonstration clinics.

All clinical absences must normally be made up.  However, for those students who have sessions to make up it is important to note that due to the limited number of chairs available in the Clinics, preference will be given to those students completing assignments and core competencies.  For significant absences from the Faculty it may not be possible to make up missed sessions within the same academic year.

In order to obtain standing in a preclinical or clinical course a student must have attended a minimum of 95% of the scheduled sessions in each academic year.


Absences:

The Faculty of Dentistry monitors all absences from the Faculty. It is expected that all students will be in attendance during their scheduled academic activities at the Faculty. Attendance may be considered by program or course directors in the evaluation of a student's performance. All absences must be reported promptly by both of these methods:

1)  To Absence Declaration tool on ACORN. The tool can be found in the ACORN Profile and Settings menu.   You should record each day of your absence as soon as it begins, up until the day before you return to classes or other academic activities. The University will use this information to provide academic accommodation and to monitor overall absences.

2)To the Student Services Office by emailing  absence@dentistry.utoronto.ca.  Absences that are three days or more in length or that result in missed tests/examinations will require a petition form to be emailed to Student Services (the Petitions Committee reserves the right to request supporting documentation for absences over three days in length or for absences that result in missed tests/examinations). 

 

Residency interviews:

  • All planned absences to be reported to Student Services.
  • Any planned absence of three or more consecutive days must be requested in writing, normally at least two weeks in advance of the scheduled absence and include where and when the interview is to take place.
  • Requests to be submitted to the Student Services Office for approval by the Undergraduate Petitions Committee.
  • Residency interviews cannot conflict with scheduled term tests.
  • If the request for Faculty absence (planned or residency) is denied, it is important to note that if a student is then absent, 5% per unapproved absence per pre-clinical/clinical half-day assignment will be deducted from the student‚Äôs final grade and students will be required to make up all missed half-day assignments.

If the request for Faculty absence (planned or residency) is denied, it is important to note that if a student is then absent, 5% per unapproved absence per preclinical/clinical half-day assignment will be deducted from the student’s final grade and students will be required to make up all missed half-day assignments.

7. Suspension

A student whose work or conduct is judged by Undergraduate Academic Standing Committee to be unsatisfactory may be suspended for a period not exceeding two years, or may be refused further registration in the Faculty.

8. Private practice external to the Faculty or clinics associated with the Faculty

No student shall, while registered in the Faculty of Dentistry and associated with a program of study or enrolled in a course therein, engage in the practice of dentistry or provide dental treatment (whether or not for financial or other remuneration) except in clinics supervised by the Faculty or with the prior permission of the Faculty.

9. Exemptions

To avoid repetition in courses that students have completed satisfactorily before entering the Faculty, an exemption policy has been developed. When an exemption in a course is granted, the student is not required to attend any part of the course and the student does not receive a grade in the course. Rather, the academic record shows XMP in that course.

Students are permitted multiple exemptions. To be eligible for exemption, the course(s) previously taken (i.e., before first registration in the Faculty) must have been completed (a) with at least a grade of A and (b) within four years of the date of the request for exemption.  Partial exemption is not granted in any course.

Requests for exemption from First Year courses will be initiated by students at the time they are admitted and should be sent to the Student Services Office. For courses in higher years, requests should be submitted to the Student Services Office at the time of registration. All requests must be submitted by the first Friday of the Fall Term. Requests will be reviewed in accordance with the above Faculty guidelines in consultation with the departments concerned. Students will be notified of the results of their requests as soon as possible. Until they are officially notified by the Faculty Registrar, students should attend all the meetings of the course(s) concerned.

10. Standing

In order to obtain final standing in a course, a student must receive at least a 60% in that course. Final standing in a course is obtained following final examination and the satisfactory completion of all clinical assignments.

Students who miss a final examination due to documented illness or other special circumstance, or who fail an examination due to illness or other circumstances during the examination, may petition to (1) receive aggregate standing or (2) write the examination during the supplemental examination period.

11. Aggregate standing

Aggregate standing is seldom granted and no student may receive aggregate standing on more than one occasion. Aggregate standing is never granted in the final year.

12.  Supplemental examinations

Students who fail a course have the privilege of a supplemental examination, with the exception of the clinical courses. A supplemental examination is defined as a special examination for students who have failed a course, and is graded "Pass" or "Fail".

Students are permitted no more than two supplemental examinations in the International Dentist Advanced Placement program.

13. Consequences of failure to obtain standing

Academic standing is assessed at the end of the academic year. A student fails to obtain academic standing by having failed more than two subjects, orby having failed a clinical course, or by having failed one or more supplemental examinations.  In the event of failing to obtain academic standing, the student will be required to repeat all courses of the failed year that have a preclinical or clinical component regardless of the achievement level, as well as those courses in which the student did not receive a grade of A- or higher, before advancing to the next year or graduation.

Any student who fails to achieve academic standing on two occasions shall be refused further registration in the Faculty.

14. Consequences of failure to pass the Fourth Year Clinical Comprehensive Care Program Oral and/or Didactic

Supplemental Examinations

For any student who fails the supplemental oral and/or written examinations for the Fourth Year Comprehensive Care Program (courses DEN450Y and DEN451Y), a remedial course of instruction for the student will be provided with selected members of the academic staff. The student will be permitted to take another supplemental oral and/or written examination(s) when judged to be sufficiently prepared. The remedial course may include a requirement to maintain clinical proficiency, or may be as extensive as failing to achieve academic standing in fourth year and repeating the year in full.

Examinations

15. Term tests

Term tests may be held in any course at the discretion of the instructor or by order of Faculty Council, and the results of such tests will be incorporated with those of the final examinations. The relative weight of tests in each course is published in the "Methods of Course Evaluation" distributed to students at registration.

Students who are absent from term tests due to illness or other extenuating circumstances are required to submit a Verification of Student Illness documentation or other satisfactory evidence to the Faculty Registrar, along with a petition. The Petitions Committee will inform the student concerning the action that will be taken with respect to the missed term test or extenuating circumstances and the course director will facilitate the terms.

In courses where no final examination is scheduled, or which extend longer than one academic year, the course director concerned may require students who have not performed satisfactorily in their term work, which may include tests, to pass a special examination. This special examination will be considered as a final examination for the purposes of obtaining standing and will carry supplemental privileges.

Specific courses will utilize digital assessments through the Examplify software. It is imperative students download Examplify to gain access to their examinations on the day of assessment. Students will be given advanced notice of which term tests will be using digital examinations. 

Test and mid-term reviews

If students have questions about their tests or midterms they may reach out to their course director. However, students must also understand that any paper reviewed by a Course Director may result in an overall grade amendment, and as such, they must accept the fact that any recheck or re-reading may lead to a lowering of the mark, or to a raising of the mark, or no change.

16. Eligibility for final examinations

A student whose term work in a course is unsatisfactory may be prevented by Undergraduate Academic Standing Committee from writing the final examination in that course. Similarly, any fourth year student who fails to meet the minimum clinical requirements and/or fails the clinical competency tests for any Clinical Comprehensive Care Program clinical discipline, may be prevented by Undergraduate Academic Standing Committee from taking the Clinical Comprehensive Care Program Final Oral and/or written examination until the minimum clinical requirements and competencies have been met to a satisfactory standard.

17.  Final examinations

All examinations conducted formally under divisional auspices will have a presiding officer for the conduct of the examination and has authority over all invigilators.

When the evaluation of the student's performance in a course includes a final examination, that examination will be worth at least one-third of the final grade. Students can ascertain which courses require final examinations by consulting the "Methods of Course Evaluation", distributed at registration.

In addition to single course examinations (which may be held separately or together with other courses as "composite" examinations, with each course marked separately), the Faculty may also conduct "comprehensive" examinations where a paper is set and marked in a combination of two or more courses and a single grade is given. A comprehensive examination counts as a single course so far as failures are concerned.

Any illegible examination paper will receive a failing grade.
 

18.  Missed examinations

Any student absent from a final or supplemental examination for reasons beyond his or her control, may petition for consideration by the Faculty. Such a petition must be filed with the Faculty Registrar on or before the last day of the relevant examination period, together with a medical certificate (see #6 in this section) and/or any other relevant documentary evidence as appropriate. If a final or supplemental examination is missed, it must be written as soon as possible after the regularly scheduled examination period or supplemental examination period, as the case may be. Only under unusual circumstances will petitions to write examinations outside designated final or supplemental examination periods be accepted. If such a petition is denied or if a student misses a final or supplemental examination and does not petition for consideration within the stated time, the student will be recorded as having failed the course, although in the case of a final (i.e. not a supplemental) examination, supplemental privileges will be retained.

19.  Supplemental examinations

Students required to write supplemental examinations or to take supplemental evaluations must do so at the appointed time, unless the Undergraduate Academic Standing Committee has granted prior permission for alternative arrangements.

Candidates are required to complete the application form, and submit the appropriate fee to the Student Services Office by the deadline date. Council reserves the right to reject applications of those failing to comply with these requirements.

Supplemental examinations and evaluations are held at the Faculty. In special circumstances the Faculty will, upon written request, endeavor to arrange for supplemental examinations for a First, Second or Third Year student to be written at another university. Students wishing to take advantage of this must undertake to defray the extra expense involved and, to allow time for the arrangements to be made, must present their written requests to the Faculty Registrar at least five weeks before such examinations.

20.  Student access to examination papers

After the issue of final grades and within six months of the final examination period, students may request from the Student Services Office photocopies of their final examination answer papers for a fee of $13 per paper. If, upon inspection of this, students wish to have the paper re-read, they must set down the reasons in detail and petition through the Faculty Registrar within six months after the final examination period.

A $36 fee is charged to submit a petition to reread an examination. Such a petition will be granted only when it contains specific instances of disagreement with the existing grading and an indication of the academic grounds for such disagreement.    Only if the revised mark is higher than the original mark as a result of this petition, the $36 fee will be refunded. Students should note that when an examination is failed, it is re-read before the marks are reported. Instructors shall not subsequently re-read any final examination except on the authority of a petition. Students must also accept the fact that any recheck or re-reading may lead to a lowering of the mark, or to a raising of the mark, or no change.

21.  Evaluation

The Faculty of Dentistry adheres to the University Assessment and Grading Practices Policy. The substance of this policy as it relates to the Faculty of Dentistry is outlined in the sections below, and is followed by reference to the policy website in Section 8.

22.  Methods of evaluation

Student performance in any course will normally be assessed by means of more than one evaluation element, and no one element will have inordinate value in the assessment. As per the University’s Governing Council, criteria for exemption from this rule may be determine by the division/faculty.

The names of the courses in which standing must be obtained, the methods by which they will be evaluated and the relative weight of these methods will be made available to students at the beginning of each academic year in the document entitled "Methods of Course Evaluation".

After the methods of evaluation have been made known, the instructor may not change them or their relative weight without the consent of a simple majority of the students enrolled in the course.

23. Preclinical evaluation

Students must be judged by the discipline to be competent in the preclinical component of the discipline’s program before being permitted to proceed to patient care in that program.

24. Clinical evaluation

Evaluations of the clinical work of students are made by clinical staff of the Faculty. Grades in clinical courses may be partly derived (a) from the day-to-day performance values obtained in each clinical program and (b) from the written assessments of the staff. Overall clinical performance is monitored throughout Third and Fourth Year and students will be notified if their performance is inadequate. If at any point during the year, the clinical work of a Third or Fourth Year student is judged by a course director to be unsatisfactory, that student may be temporarily suspended from treating patients and given remedial preclinical work until he or she has regained the standard of clinical skills necessary for the treatment of patients. Failure to improve performance to a satisfactory level by the date specified by the course director will prevent a student from being promoted to Fourth Year or from graduating.

25. Grading

The following grading scale is normally used in the D.D.S. program.

Didactic, Preclinical and Clinical Courses

Percentage

Letter Grade

Grade Point Value

Grade Definition

90-100

A+

4.0

Excellent

85-89

A

4.0

Excellent

80-84

A-

3.7

Excellent

77-79

B+

3.3

Good

73-76

B

3.0

Good

70-72

B-

2.7

Good

67-69

C+

2.3

Adequate

63-66

C

2.0

Adequate

60-62

C-

1.7

Adequate

0-59

F

0.0

Failure

60-100

P

0.0

Pass*

0-59

FL

0.0

Failure*

* of a supplemental exam

Designators and other non-grade symbols, which may be used in reporting course results, are shown below.

CR/NCR = Credit, No Credit.  CR or NCR is assigned to a few courses. The grades CR and NCR have no numerical equivalence and are not included in the calculation of Session Averages.

XMP = Exempt. XMP is assigned by a divisional committee upon approval of a student’s request for exemption.  It carries credit for the course but is not considered for averaging purposes.

NGA = No Grade Available. NGA is assigned by the division in the extraordinary case that a grade is not available for one of its students enrolled in a course. It must be replaced by a regular grade assigned by the instructor or by another symbol assigned during the divisional review. It carries no credit for the course and is not considered for averaging purposes.

INC = Incomplete.  INC is assigned by the instructor or divisional committee, normally as a final report, where course work is not completed but where there are no grounds for assigning a failing grade. It carries no credit for the course and is not considered for averaging purposes.

WDR = Withdrawn without academic penalty. WDR is assigned by the divisional review committee upon approval of a student’s petition for late withdrawal from a course.  It carries no credit for the course and is not considered for averaging purposes.

At the end of each term, the grades received for that term can be retrieved by the student from R.O.S.I. (Repository of Student Information) on the University of Toronto's website.

26.  Grade Point Average (GPA)

The Grade Point Average is the weighted sum of the grade points earned (weighted by the credits assigned to each course), divided by the total number of credits for the courses in which grade points were earned. Courses with a grade of CR, NCR, XMP, NGA, INC, WDR, P and FL will not be included in determining the average; i.e., the result of a supplemental examination will not be included in determining the GPA but the original failing grade will be.  The Sessional GPA is based on the courses taken in a single session while the cumulative GPA takes into account all courses taken for degree credit in the Faculty.

27. Graduating with Honours

Honours standing will be awarded to students with a final cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or greater.

28. Liability of the university

The University will not be responsible for, and the student will indemnify the University and the Faculty against claims for any losses or damages resulting from the provision of dental care or treatment by a student which has not been authorized and supervised by the Faculty.

Registration Certificate for Dental Practice

A degree in Dentistry does not, in itself, confer the right to practice dentistry in any part of Canada. To acquire this right a university graduate in dentistry must hold the certificate of the dental regulatory body of the province in which he or she elects to engage in practice. Each provincial regulatory body determines what the matriculation and professional requirements shall be and when registration is to be effected.

In each of the provinces of Canada, the Legislature has enacted laws regulating the practice of dentistry, and in each province the dental act provides for a corporate body, which grants certificates of registration/licenses to practice dentistry within that province.

Certificate of Registration to practice in Ontario

A candidate desiring to practice dentistry in Ontario should consult the Registrar, Royal College of Dental

Surgeons of Ontario, 6 Crescent Road, Fifth Floor, Toronto, Ontario M4W 1T1 (416) 961-6555.

License to practice in other provinces of Canada

A candidate who desires to acquire the right to practice in Canada elsewhere than in the province of Ontario should obtain information regarding the requirements for practice in the province concerned. A list of the officials follows:

Alberta: Registrar, Alberta Dental Association, 8230-105th Street, Suite 101, Edmonton, Alta., T6E 5H9, (780) 432-1012

British Columbia: Registrar, College of Dental Surgeons of British Columbia, 1765 West 8th Avenue, Suite

500, Vancouver, B.C., V6J 5C6, (604) 736-3621

Manitoba: Registrar, Manitoba Dental Association, 698 Corydon Avenue, Suite 103, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3M 0X9, (204) 988-5300

New Brunswick: Registrar, New Brunswick Dental Society, 520 rue King Street, Carleton Place #820, P. O. Box 488, Station "A", Fredericton, N. B. E3B 4Z9, (506) 452-8575

Newfoundland: Registrar, Newfoundland Dental Board, 6th Floor, The Fortis Building, 139 Water Street, St John's, Nfld.,  A1C 1B2, (709) 579-2391

Nova Scotia: Registrar, Provincial Dental Board of Nova Scotia, Ste 102, 1559 Brunswick St., Halifax, Nova

Scotia, B3J 2G1, (902) 420-0083

Nunavut:  Registrar, P.O. Box 390, Kugluktuk, NU X0B 0E0, Tel:  (867) 982-7668.

Prince Edward Island:  Registrar, Dental Council of P.E.I., 184 Belvedere Avenue, Charlottetown, P.E.I., CIA 2Z1, (902) 628-8088

Quebec: Directeur general et Secretaire, Ordre des dentistes du Quebec, 625, Boulevard Rene Levesque

Ouest, 15e Etage, Montreal, Quebec H3B 1R2, (514) 875-8511

Saskatchewan: Registrar, College of Dental Surgeons of Saskatchewan, 728 Spadina Cres. East, Suite 202, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7K 4H7, (306) 244-5072

North West Territories: Registrar, Professional Licensing, Government of the North West Territories,

Health and Social Services, 8th Floor, Centre Square Tower, P.O. Box 1320, Yellowknife, N.W.T., X1A 2L9, (867) 920-8058

Yukon: Manager of Consumer Services, Consumer and Commercial Services, Department of Justice, P.O. Box 2703, J-6, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6, (867) 667-5111.

License to practice elsewhere than Canada

A candidate who desires to acquire the right to practice elsewhere than Canada should obtain information regarding the requirements for practice from the dental authorities in the country in which he or she wishes to practice.

The National Dental Examining Board of Canada

Current undergraduates of the Faculty are entitled to receive the Board's Certificate provided they have successfully completed the written examination and the Objective Structured Clinical Examination

(OSCE). An application, together with the prescribed fee, must be submitted by the application deadline. Information and application forms will be provided to Fourth Year students during the Fall session.

Further information may be obtained by writing to the Registrar of the NDEB at 80 Elgin Street, 2nd

Floor, Ottawa, ON K1P 4R2, (613) 236-5912.

 

Curriculum 2019-2020

 

FIRST YEAR

Course No.

Course Title

Lecture hours

Seminar hours

Laboratory hours

Clinic hours

Total hours

Course weight

DEN103Y1

Dental Public Health I

28

0

0

0

28

0.25

DEN106Y1

Gross Anatomy

71

0

114

0

185

1.25

DEN109H1

Histology

41

0

24

0

65

0.5

DEN113Y1

Preventive Dentistry

37.5

0

0

0

37.5

0.25

DEN118H1

Dental Anatomy and Occlusion

30.5

0

60.5

0

91

0.5

DEN121H1

Biological Basis of Oral Health/Disease

26

0

0

0

26

0.25

DEN124H1

Microbiology

36

0

0

0

36

0.5

DEN130H1

Restorative Dentistry (Didactic)

56

0

0

0

56

0.5

DEN150Y1

Biomaterials Science

26

0

82

0

108

0.75

DEN177H1

Prosthodontics

15

0

49

0

64

0.5

DEN180H1

Restorative Dentistry (Preclinical)

0

0

79.5

0

79.5

0.5

DEN199Y1

CCP1- Intro to Comprehensive Care Program

46.5

0

0

58

104.5

Pass/Fail

 

Total

413.5

0

409

58

880.5

5.75

 

 

SECOND YEAR

 

Course No.

Course Title

Lecture hours

Seminar hours

Laboratory hours

Clinic hours

Total hours

Course weight

 

DEN200H1

Anaesthesia

14

0

0

6

20

0.25

 

DEN202H1

Communication Skills

0

6

0

0

6

Pass/Fail

 

DEN203H1

Basic Disease Mechanisms

23

11

0

0

34

0.25

 

DEN207H1

Dental Public Health II

25

15

0

0

40

0.25

 

DEN208H1

Endodontics

30.5

0

54

0

84.5

0.5

 

DEN211Y1

Periodontics

30

0

0

0

30

0.25

 

DEN212Y1

Pharmacology

44

42

0

0

86

0.75

 

DEN215H1

Preventive Dentistry & Clinical Nutrition

21

11

0

0

32

0.25

 

DEN217Y1

Oral and Maxillofacial

14

2

0

5

21

0.25

 

DEN218Y1

Restorative Dentistry (Didactic)

64

0

0

0

64

0.75

 

DEN219H1

Medicine and Pathology

18

9

0

0

27

0.25

 

DEN222H1

Orthodontics

16

28

0

0

44

0.25

 

DEN223H1

Pediatric Dentistry

14

0

19.5

0

33.5

0.25

 

DEN249H1

Ethics, Professionalism, Law I*

1.5

10

0

0

11.5

Pass/Fail

 

DEN277Y1

Prosthodontics

34

0

116

0

150

1

 

DEN280Y1

Restorative Dentistry (Clinical)

0

0

168.5

0

168.5

0.75

 

DEN299Y1

CCP2 ‚Äď Prev. & Perio. Services

40

0

0

96

136

Pass/Fail

 

 

Total

389

134

358

107

988

6

 

THIRD YEAR

Course No.

Course Title

Lecture hours

Seminar hours

Laboratory hours

Clinic hours

Total hours

Course weight

DEN301H1

Anaesthesia

14

0

0

3

17

0.25

DEN303H1

Endodontics

14

0

0

0

14

0.25

DEN308Y1

Dental Public Health III

18

0

0

0

18

0.25

DEN315Y1

Oral Medicine and Pathology

54

28

0

0

82

0.75

DEN317Y1

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology

14

0

0

39

53

0.5

DEN318Y1

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

33

2.5

0

15

50.5

0.5

DEN322Y1

Orthodontics (Didactic)

28.5

0

0

0

28.5

0.25

DEN323Y1

Pediatric Dentistry (Didactic)

24

0

0

0

24

0.25

DEN324H1

Periodontics (Didactic)

13

0

0

0

13

0.25

DEN327H1

Pharmacology

21

0

0

0

21

0.25

DEN333Y1

Prosthodontics (Didactic)

28.5

18

0

0

46.5

0.25

DEN336Y1

Restorative Dentistry (Didactic)

11.5

0

0

0

11.5

0.25

DEN349H1

Ethics, Professionalism, Law II*

1.5

10

0

0

11.5

Pass/Fail

DEN350Y1

CCP3- Intro to Treatment Planning

16.5

0

0

270

286.5

Pass/Fail

DEN356Y1

Oral Diagnosis and Oral Medicine

17.5

15.5

0

45

78

1

DEN365Y1

Orthodontics (Clinical)

0

0

0

30

30

0.25

DEN368Y1

Pediatric Dentistry (Clinical)

0

0

0

36

36

****

DEN371Y1

Periodontics (Clinical)

0

2

0

**

**

0.75

DEN374Y1

Preventive Dentistry

10

10

0

**

**

0.25

DEN377Y1

Prosthodontics (Clinical)

0

0

0

**

**

****

DEN380Y1

Restorative Dentistry (Clinical)***

0

0

12

***

***

0.75

DEN409Y1

Practice Administration

40.5

0

0

0

40.5

****

 

Total

359.5

86

12

438

895.5

7

* On-line seminars

**Clinic hours occur within CCP3 Clinic hours

**R1-R4 sessions included under Lab hrs

****No final grade reported in DDS3

               

The Third Year class follows the usual academic year until the end of classes in early April for Third Year.  The class then continues for the final examinations and for work in the clinics with the year ending in late July.

                             

 

 

MAY-JULY PERIOD

Course No.

Course Title

Lecture hours

Seminar hours

Laboratory hours

Clinic hours

Total hours

Course weight

DEN409Y1

Practice Administration

5.5

0

0

0

5.5

*

    DEN450Y1

CCP4 - Comprehensive Care (Clinical)

0

0

0

171

171

*

DEN451Y1

CCP IV - Comprehensive Care (didactic)

0

3

0

0

3

*

DEN456Y1

Oral Diagnosis and Oral Medicine

1

0

0

33

34

*

    DEN459Y1

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology

0

0

0

9

9

*

    DEN462Y1

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

0

0

0

9

9

*

    DEN465Y1

Orthodontics

0

0

0

9

9

*

DEN468Y1

Pediatric Dentistry

0

0

0

13.5

13.5

*

DEN490Y1

Community Based Service Learning**

7

0

0

***

7

*

 

Total

13.5

3

0

244.5

267

*

*May-July hours contribute to DDS4 course weights

**Psychiatry and Dentistry lectures

***Hospital rotations occur within CCP4 Clinic hours

 

FOURTH YEAR

Course No.

Course Title

Lecture hours

Seminar hours

Laboratory hours

Clinic hours

Total hours

Course weight

DEN400H1

Anaesthesia

0

0

0

6

6

Pass/Fail

DEN409Y1

Practice Administration

25.5

0

0

0

25.5

0.25

DEN410H1

Orofacial Pain:  Mechanisms, Diagnosis, Management*

27.75

0

0

0

27.75

Pass/Fail

DEN411Y1

Clinical Application of Practice Administration

0

0

0

**

0

Pass/Fail

DEN449H1

Ethics, Professionalism, Law III

9

3

0

0

12

Pass/Fail

DEN450Y1

CCP4 - Comprehensive Care (Clinical)

0

0

0

402

402

1.75

DEN451Y1

CCP4 - Comprehensive Care (didactic)

10

15

0

0

25

0.25

DEN453Y1

Endodontics

12

0

0

**

**

1

DEN456Y1

Oral Diagnosis & Oral Medicine

1.5

0

0

82.5

84

1

DEN459Y1

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology

0

2

0

18

20

0.25

DEN462Y1

Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery

14

0

0

63

77

0.75

DEN465Y1

Orthodontics

13

9

15

15

52

0.5

DEN468Y1

Pediatric Dentistry

0

0

0

42

42

0.75

DEN471Y1

Periodontics

0

0

0

**

**

0.75

DEN474Y1

Preventive Dentistry

0

0

0

**

**

0.25

DEN477Y1

Prosthodontics

14

0

0

**

**

1

DEN480Y1

Restorative Dentistry

9

0

0

**

**

0.75

DEN490Y1

Community Based Service Learning

6

0

0

**

**

Pass/Fail

DEN491Y1

Dental Outreach Community Services

0

0

0

0

0

Pass/Fail

DEN492Y1

Dental Outreach Global Services

0

0

0

0

0

Pass/Fail

 

Total

141.75

29

15

628.5

814.25

9.25

* On-line seminars

**Clinic hours occur within CCP3 Clinic hours

 

Course descriptions: Doctor of Dental Surgery

First Year

In the first year the student is taught many of the basic science courses which are the foundation for clinical dentistry. In these courses every opportunity is taken to introduce dentally relevant material. At the same time the student is introduced to some of the broader concepts of the practice of dentistry. An important aspect of this first year is the student's introduction to dental materials and the technical aspects of restorative dentistry. In these courses particular attention is paid to evaluating digital skills so that students with potential problems in this area can be identified.

DEN103Y1 Dental Public Health I

The first year curriculum in Dental Public Health I consists of four modules. The modules are designed to provide the context and scientific support for an evidence-based approach to improving individual and population oral health.

MODULE I: EPIDEMIOLOGICAL METHODS

This module provides students with an understanding of the scientific methods in the study of health and disease.  Students will learn: the epidemiological approach and logic of epidemiological enquiry; descriptive, analytic and experimental epidemiological designs and their strengths and weaknesses; measures of risk; and common flaws in epidemiological studies.

MODULE II: EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ORAL DISEASES

In this module, students will cover the epidemiology of oral diseases and conditions, including dental caries, periodontal disease, and oral cancer, including risk factors that point to individual and population level preventive strategies. Measures of oral diseases and oral health-related quality of life will also be addressed.

MODULE III: DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH AND POPULATION HEALTH STRATEGIES

This module will develop the student’s understanding of current concepts of health and the significance of health outcomes in clinical practice and the broader social and environmental factors that impact on the health of individuals and populations.

MODULE IV: CURRENT ISSUES IN ORAL HEALTH CARE

Society has established health professions and systems of organizing, financing and delivering health care. This is a very dynamic environment,  with issues continually arising within the profession and between society and the profession. This module explores the nature of these issues from both society’s expectations and the profession’s perspective.

C. QUI√ĎONEZ, STAFF

DEN106Y1 Gross Anatomy

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the gross structure and function of all human body systems, including neuroanatomy and systems anatomy. In addition, a comprehensive, detailed study of the head, neck and central nervous system is undertaken to provide the student with a basis upon which to build his/her clinical knowledge.  Students will be required to perform a basic dissection of the thorax and a comprehensive dissection of the neck and head in order to complement and reinforce the lecture series.

J.LAPRADE, V. MENDES, STAFF

DEN109H1 Histology

The course provides an overview of the microscopic anatomy of the human body with special emphasis on the development and structure of the oral cavity and its components. There is a basic introduction to the tissue types, followed by a detailed study of the microscopic structure of the oral cavity, and individual organ systems. The main objective of the course is to examine and recognize the cells and tissues through microscopic examination, and to correlate the morphology to the function of tissues and organs. The lectures are complemented with computer-based laboratory sessions utilizing an online virtual slide box.    

D. CHUGH, STAFF

DEN113Y1 Preventive Dentistry

This course introduces students to concepts related to preventive dentistry. Lectures provide introductory knowledge of dental diseases and disorders and health literacy followed by detailed information on preventive dentistry and preventive strategies that clinicians can apply to patients. Students will work in groups to plan, prepare and present a preventive oral health presentation.

M. CLARKE, STAFF

DEN118H1 Dental Anatomy and Occlusion

This course is designated to teach the students: (1) Tooth notation (2) the internal and external anatomy of the deciduous and permanent teeth, (3) the chronology of dental eruption, (4) evolution of molar tooth, (5) genetic and environmental factors that influence teeth morphology, (6) dental anatomy and restorative dentistry, (7) development and description of primary occlusion, (8) development of early adult occlusion, (9) fundamental principles of static and dynamic occlusion, and (10) malocclusion.

A. PRAKKI , G. ANDERSON, , STAFF

DEN121Y1 Biological Basis of Oral Health and Disease

This comprehensive course is designed to provide the preclinical student a broad-based understanding of the basic biological and physiological processes related to the healthy and diseased states of the oral cavity, including the dentitions.

The first set of lectures explores the physiology of oral-facial functions, particularly those associated with pain and touch, taste, chewing, swallowing, respiration, related motor activities, oral-facial microcirculations and development of speech and language.

The second series of lectures deals with the genetics, formation, composition, metabolism, development, repair and regeneration of hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity. The physiology of saliva production, its composition and the microbial ecology of oral biofilms, as they relate to oral diseases and their prevention, are introduced. The continuum of changes from birth to senescence that occur in the oral cavity and their impact on dental treatment are presented in a series of lectures. Concepts related to the psychological importance of the oral cavity in overall health and the psycho-physiological correlates of the oral cavity are discussed.

G. KULKARNI, STAFF

DEN124H1 Microbiology

The course covers basic, pathogenic and oral microbiology and immunology and related infection control practices. Its objective is to provide the dental student with an understanding of bacterial, viral and fungal microorganisms and their interactions with the human host in health and disease. Emphasis is placed on (1) diseases with oral and facial manifestations, (2) diseases influencing the planning and performance of dental treatment for patients, and (3) diseases of major public health importance.

C. McCULLOCH, STAFF

DEN130H1/DEN180H1 Restorative Dentistry

These courses in restorative dentistry begin early in January. The course starts with an introduction to the dental caries disease, its diagnosis, classification, etiology and clinical implications. The students are also introduced to the basic principles in the treatment of dental caries by restorative means. The principles of cavity preparation are related to the physical properties of the restorative material and to the anatomy and histology of the dental tissues. The relationship between restorative procedures and prevention of further disease is stressed.

Lectures on instrumentation, cavity preparation and restoration are supplemented by group instruction in the laboratory. Practice in developing digital dexterity in cavity preparation and restoration is provided by preclinical exercises mostly on ivorine teeth in a manikin head for clinical simulation.

G.M. DE SOUZA, STAFF

DEN150Y1 Biomaterials Science

The objective of this course is to provide fundamental knowledge of materials science required to understand the scientific basis for selection, preparation and use of dental materials. The lectures include knowledge from various fields such as metallurgy, engineering mechanics, ceramics, polymer science and chemical engineering. The laboratory program provides direct exposure to various classes of dental materials. In the laboratory the relationship of manipulation variables to microstructure, mechanical properties, bio-stability and clinical performance is emphasized.

B. SHOKATI, STAFF

DEN177H1 Prosthodontics

Prosthodontics is a clinical program focused on alleviating the needs of patients with acquired loss or congenital absence of oral tissues by improving function, comfort and appearance using suitable artificial substitutes made from alloplastic materials. Some of the fundamentals taught in the 1st year basic sciences courses will be reinforced by contextualizing these to particular elements of prosthodontic practice. The student will also learn how to complete a limited number of selected clinical and laboratory procedures employed when treating patients with edentate jaws using conventional or implant prostheses. Students use preclinical manikin simulation in projects to appreciate and develop their skills in edentulous and implant impressions, jaw registrations, tooth shade and mold selection, and custom tooth arrangements of a complete maxillary denture and an implant supported mandibular overdenture. The teaching format includes lectures and seminars, complemented with practical demonstrations followed by laboratory and clinical exercises.

B. SHOKATI, STAFF

DEN199Y Comprehensive Care 1 ‚Äď Preclinical Skills

The Comprehensive Care Program (CCP1) is a preclinical course that provides students with an introduction to basic concepts and methodologies for clinical practice.

The course involves 3 components:

Component 1: Lectures introduce basic skills and concepts to prepare students for practical preclinical sessions.

Component 2: Clinical sessions involve practice on patient simulators and on student partners. Student operators will practice basic preclinical skills on assigned student partners. Clinical experiences include: practicing the Faculty's infection control standards, basic oral health indices, rubber cup polishing, topical fluoride and oral self-care instruction sessions. Students will practice basic record keeping and documentation using electronic technology.

Component 3: Dental assisting rotations with upper year students in various clinics provide opportunities to practice clinical protocols, assist with procedures and observe patient management and treatment skills.

M. CLARKE, J. POSLUNS, STAFF

 

Second Year

In Second Year the student's education in the basic sciences is completed and more emphasis occurs on the study of dental disease and its treatment. Combined teaching in the practical arts of dentistry occurs in this year.

 

DEN200H1 Anaesthesia

The courses in Anaesthesia run from the second through the third and fourth dental academic years. These courses cover aspects of pain control and patient management in order to provide the dental student with the knowledge and skills needed to treat the conscious patient without pain or apprehension. The objectives of the course in second year are to provide students with in-depth pharmacologic knowledge of the local anaesthetic solutions used in dentistry, as well as the ability to administer these drugs safely and effectively. This course is roughly divided into two parts. The first part of the course discusses specific injection techniques covering all forms of intra-oral anaesthesia for dentistry in the mandibular and maxillary arches, as well as possible complications, and the required armamentarium. There is also a hands-on element where students practice injection techniques on each other in a clinical setting. The second part of the course provides an in-depth review of the pharmacology of local anaesthetics.     

P. NKANSAH, STAFF

DEN202H1 Communication Skills

In addition to knowledge and technical skills, effective communication is essential to the dentist-patient relationship and quality patient care. In this course students will have the opportunity to practice their communication skills in simulated scenarios using standardized patents. Cases are designed to depict commonly encountered issues found in clinical practice. The objective is to provide dental students with experience dealing with a variety of patient situations that require effective communication skills, including the ability to clearly and concisely articulate information to patients and the use of active listening skills, to successfully gather and impart information, handle patients’ emotions sensitively, and to demonstrate empathy, rapport, professionalism, and ethical awareness. This is a credit/ non-credit based course.

L. DEMPSTER, STAFF

DEN203H1 Basic Disease Mechanisms

The course instructs second year students in the general principles of pathology, emphasizing pathogenetic and morphological aspects of disease. The course serves as an introduction to general and systemic pathology, and includes an overview of the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, gross and microscopic pathology of major disease processes. Basic concepts that are covered include cell injury and adaptation, cell death, inflammation and repair, the immune response, hemostasis, and neoplasia.  Systemic pathology, as it relates to dentistry, will also be studied, including hematopathology and diseases of the skin, bone/joint, and gastrointestinal tract.

The lectures are complemented with computer-based seminar sessions utilizing an online virtual slide box.      

D. CHUGH, STAFF

DEN207H1 Dental Public Health II

This course will demonstrate the scientific basis for clinical decision-making in prognosis, causation, diagnosis and therapy following the principles of evidence-based health care. Examples from the dental literature are used to illustrate the concepts and their practical application. Besides didactic lectures, there will be several supervised small group tutorial sessions through which, the students will further develop evidence-based thinking and critical analysis of the literature. The specific objectives of the course are: 1) to introduce principles of epidemiology as applied to clinical research; 2) to provide the students with the fundamental scientific skills in clinical epidemiology to enable them to practice evidence-based dental care; 3) to provide the students with skills in answering questions using biomedical literature; 4) to provide students with the skills needed to critically appraise a biomedical research article.

A. AZARPAZHOOH, STAFF

DEN208H1 Endodontics

This course offers the student didactic and preclinical experiences designed to establish the student’s basic knowledge of the nature, the diagnosis and the treatment of pulpal and periapical disease.  The didactic and preclinical courses are given during the winter and spring terms. 

The didactic component commences with an overview of the endodontic disease and associated therapies. Later it provides more comprehensive review of the Pulpal and periapical physiology, pathology and diagnosis of healthy and diseased endodontium. A portion of the course is dedicated to the understanding, prevention and treatment of the Endodontic emergencies and Traumatic injuries of the teeth. The preclinical component is mostly directed towards preparing the student to perform basic clinical endodontic procedures prior to entering the clinics in third year.

P.CHERKAS, STAFF

DEN211Y1 Periodontics

The principal objective of the full program in periodontics is to educate and prepare general practitioners of dentistry to serve the universal public need of prevention, recognition and comprehensive diagnosis and treatment of periodontal diseases. In conjunction with Comprehensive Care Program II ‚Äď Preventive and Periodontal Services (DEN299Y), this course commences in-depth education in periodontics, building on the conceptual foundations established in the first year programs in basic sciences, dental public health and preventive dentistry. The program integrates didactic, preclinical and clinical elements aiming to achieve detailed understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and approaches to therapy for the more common types of periodontal conditions. The didactic element centers on periodontal pathology, etiology, classification of periodontal diseases, fundamentals of clinical decision-making, and treatment of inflammation.

J. LAI, STAFF

DEN212Y1 Pharmacology

The objective of this course is to provide students with an integrated knowledge of the mechanism of action of drugs based on the understanding of systems physiology, pathology and relevance to clinical practice. Upon completion of the course the students should have an understanding of general principles as well as the pharmacology and therapeutics of all categories of drugs. There is a greater emphasis on agents commonly used in dentistry. The major topics covered include principles of pharmacokinetics (i.e., what the body does to drugs), and pharmacodynamics (i.e., mechanisms of drug action), autonomics, analgesics, anti-infectives, general anaesthetics, respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, antineoplastics and oral cancer, anticoagulants, endocrine and central nervous systems, among others. Clinically relevant case studies are included and students work in small groups. This course provides the basis for the third year pharmacology course which focuses on therapeutics of direct importance to dental management.

J. LANÇA, STAFF

DEN215H1 Preventive Dentistry

This course is designed in a lecture and seminar format to provide the understanding of the concepts of preventive dentistry focusing on the prevention of oral diseases. This course will provide strategies to identify those at risk and to discuss treatment options available to reduce the risk of dental disease throughout life. Students will be able to introduce therapies that are known to reduce the risk and prevent dental caries, periodontal disease or oral cancer. Also, practical application of healthy eating principles with an emphasis on prevention of dental disease will be reviewed. We will also discuss preventative care for the medically compromised and geriatric patients.

A. OUANOUNOU, STAFF

DEN217Y1 Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology

Lectures and seminars introduce the student to the principles of radiation physics and hygiene, biology, radiographic imaging modalities, technique and the interpretation of normal anatomy and its variations, including common diseases affecting the teeth and jaws. Clinical sessions provide students with the opportunity to learn and practice intra-oral imaging techniques incorporating infection control protocol, utilizing the two digital imaging systems (CMOS and PSP receptors). Radiographic interpretation is introduced reinforcing lecture material.

M. CASH, STAFF

DEN218Y1/280Y1 Restorative Dentistry

The objective of this course is to prepare students for clinical practice in third and fourth years. Students are taught the principles, which govern the need for initial and retreatment restorative therapy, the criteria for long-term clinical acceptability and the reasons for restorative failure. The principles and methods for restoring teeth to structural, functional and aesthetic acceptability are presented in lectures and laboratory demonstrations. 

The course is divided into three modules. The fall term is devoted to cariology and direct restorative therapy. The cariology section features treatment of simulated carious lesions on ivorine teeth and actual caries on extracted teeth. Emphasis is given to the diagnosis of initial and recurrent caries, provision of conservative restorative therapy and the decision making process related to replacement therapy. The winter term involves preparations for laboratory-fabricated for extra coronal restorations.  CAD-CAM technology for fabrication of extracoronal restorations is introduced at this level.  The spring term has two components:  the esthetic module and the restoration of the endodontically treated tooth. All pre-clincal treatment sessions utilize ivorine and natural tooth typodonts in phantom heads specially designed to simulate the clinical condition. 

Upon completion of the course students should possess the appropriate theoretical and practical knowledge and have developed the manual expertise to provide patients with the majority of single tooth restorative services required in modern dental practice.

W. EL-BADRAWY, STAFF

DEN219H1 Medicine and Pathology

The course is designed to provide basic knowledge of common medical conditions, reviewing the etiology, pathogenesis, pathologic and clinical features of each condition. The purpose of the course is to understand the pathologic basis of the medical condition, how it may impact the patient’s health, how the illness presents clinically at the bedside, and to develop an approach to treating patients with chronic medical conditions. The relevance of these conditions on the practice of dentistry is emphasized throughout the course. The course builds upon content learned in Basic Disease Mechanisms and Pharmacology, but provides a more clinical perspective. The lectures are complemented with three problem-based learning seminars revolving around real-life scenarios that may be seen in dental practice. 

D. CHUGH, N. MARCHESE, STAFF

DEN222H1 Orthodontics

This orthodontic course comprises lectures, preclinical seminars, and diagnostic case analyses. The objective is to teach students to recognize and diagnose the various forms of malocclusion, and understand the etiologic factors associated with the genesis of orthodontic abnormalities. Cephalometric and model analyses are studied as the basis for providing knowledge of normal and abnormal facial development. Students participate in lectures, case analysis seminars and preclinical diagnostic exercises designed to prepare them for future clinical practice. Student progress and performance are evaluated through cephalometric and model analysis competency tests, a term test, case analysis and presentation of assigned sets of diagnostic records and a final examination.    

S. SURI, STAFF

DEN223H1 Pediatric Dentistry

Pediatric Dentistry commences in second year and continues throughout third and fourth years. The didactic and clinical program develops the concept that Pediatric Dentistry is concerned with total dental care of the child and adolescent during growth and development from birth to adolescence. The management, prevention and treatment of dental conditions in children are emphasized during clinical sessions. Second Year: The restorative component is introduced at the preclinical level in conjunction with the Department of Restorative Dentistry. These procedures are supplemented by lectures, seminars and videotape demonstrations.

P. ANDREWS, STAFF

DEN249H1 Ethics, Professionalism, Law I

Ethics is critical to being a professional and a working knowledge of the legislation that impacts on practicing dentists is important. To assist students in their understanding of this important topic, an online self-study course was developed by the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario in conjunction with the Faculty of Dentistry. The course is made up of four (4) modules comprising the reading of selected articles / other publications / papers which will either be posted online or their link provided and the consideration of a number of ethical, legal and professional considerations for each module. Students are divided into small groups and work through the various modules and complete the case study assignment for each under the guidance of a group facilitator and in conjunction with input and on-line interaction with their small discussion group.

I. FEFERGRAD, STAFF

DEN277Y1 Prosthodontics

The learning objectives of this course are to apply mechanical and biological principles in prosthesis treatment planning and design to improve or restore the form and function in partially edentulous situations. The student will learn how to complete a limited number of selected clinical and laboratory phases of removable and fixed partial dentures (RPD and FPD, respectively), including conventional tooth- or implant-supported prostheses, and the procedures employed when treating partially edentate patients. The fabrication steps take place on manikins, stone models, and student partners, as appropriate. Completed projects and defined seminars allow for development and assessment of skills required for successful treatment planning.  Knowledge, comprehension, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation are assessed with projects and term tests as well as competency tests for both RPDs and FPDs. The teaching format includes lectures and group seminars, complemented with practical demonstrations followed by laboratory and clinical exercises.

E. SOMOGYI-GANSS, STAFF

DEN299Y1 Comprehensive Care Program II ‚Äď Preventive and Periodontal Services

The objectives of this course are to build on the knowledge and skills acquired in DEN199Y and to provide clinical experience in the management and control of inflammatory periodontal conditions of patients.

Education about comprehensive care is focused on practical sessions that include assisting 4th year undergraduate dental students during their CCP clinical treatment assignments. These will also incorporate one-on-one shadowing of a Treatment Coordinator, in order for the student to appreciate the process of treatment planning, associated required documentation and patient communication. Additionally, Group Case Discussion Sessions and IPAC audits of senior students will be undertaken, to evaluate the participants’ understanding of the practical concepts and Infection Control Protocols learned in lectures and clinical rotations.

Development of clinical skills and knowledge about periodontal examination, patient motivation, instruction in oral hygiene, scaling, root planing and nightguard delivery and adjustment are taught in sessions during which students, under close supervision, administer maintenance care to new or previously treated general clinic patients.

The emphasis is to impress upon students the importance of periodontics within the realm of general dental care, for the long term maintenance of a healthy natural dentition. Students are expected to operate efficiently with appropriate infection control precautions.

At the completion of the year, students are expected to attain clinical competency in preventive services (oral hygiene instruction, scaling, polishing) and periodontal services (root planing).

In addition, students will become familiar with the caries risk assessment protocol, by performing a caries risk assessment on their partner. 

Completion of the course will contribute to the preparation of the student for entry into the 3rd year Comprehensive Care Program for clinical treatment of patients.

R. GHILZON, D. CORNELL, STAFF

DEN356Y1 Oral Diagnosis and Oral Medicine

The course starts in the Second Year and continues through Third Year to teach students a system of diagnosis of dental and oral disease. Emphasis is placed on methods of history taking, examination, patient evaluation and management as well as treatment planning. This will include the evaluation and management of healthy patients as well as of those with a wide variety of co-existing medical disorders. Students will learn the impact of medical conditions on treatment planning and provision of dental care.

During the whole of Third Year, students will attend the Oral Diagnosis and Emergency Clinics in order to obtain practical experience in the evaluation and management of a large and varied group of patients. They will also learn how to request and evaluate medical information from their patient’s physicians or hospitals. In the Faculty Emergency Clinic, the students learn to diagnose and manage a wide range of dental emergencies. The clinical sessions provide practical application of the material covered in the lecture/seminar component of the course and prepare students for the more detailed treatment planning sessions involved in the provision of comprehensive care.

K. BURGESS, R. BLACK, STAFF

 

Third Year

Clinical Practice

The student now embarks upon the provision of clinical care for assigned patients. Emphasis is on the comprehensive assessment and appropriate management of the oral care needs for all patients for whom the student is the primary provider. Wherever possible, new patients are assigned to students at their initial appointment in Oral Diagnosis in order to allow continuity of care from initial patient assessment to treatment completion within the Comprehensive Care Program. Students perform planned clinical procedures under the close supervision and guidance provided by program instructors. During all clinical sessions, students apply the basic principles, knowledge and skills that they have acquired in their preclinical education with the objective that by the end of the year each student is able to provide a wide range of the basic treatment services with an appropriate level of confidence.

 

DEN301Y1 Anaesthesia

The objective of this course is to provide an understanding of the modalities of sedation and anaesthesia and the ability to administer minimal sedation when indicated for patients in dentistry. The focus is to achieve competency in the administration of nitrous oxide:oxygen sedation. Students should also become knowledgeable in oral sedation and aim for competency in its administration for adult patients. This course will also supplement material from other courses in preparing dentists to manage medical emergencies. Students will gain experience in the clinical application of nitrous oxide:oxygen. After formal instruction is completed, students may administer nitrous oxide:oxygen or oral sedation to their own adult patients in the clinic. Students will also write anaesthesia consultations for their patients in the clinic.

D. HAAS, STAFF

DEN303H1/DEN453Y1 Endodontics

This course offers the student didactic and clinical components. The didactic component in the fall term is designed to broaden the knowledge pertaining to endodontic disease and diagnosis. Initial clinical experience is acquired through assisting and observation assignments in the undergraduate and graduate clinics. Further clinical experience is gained through performing endodontic treatment to patients on anterior, premolar and molar teeth.

P. CHERKAS, STAFF

DEN308Y1 Dental Public Health III

Module VII: Communication in Dental Practice

This module aims to make students aware of central role played by communication in dental practice and builds on the content covered in the communication skills course in second year. The curriculum will cover: communication and its association with pain, anxiety and therapeutic outcomes; models of the dentist-patient relationship; communication in the health care team; consultation tasks and styles; common agendas and barriers in communication and challenging patient encounters.

Module VIII: Psychological and Behavioral Issues in Dental Practice

The aims of this module are to make students aware of common psychological and behavioural problems encountered in dental practice and discussion of psychological principles and strategies that can be employed to manage these problems. This module covers: understanding dental fear and anxiety, cognitive and behavioural factors associated with dental anxiety; patient beliefs and perceptions about dental anxiety; management and treatment of the dentally anxious adult and child; communicating pain in dentistry and pain in vulnerable populations.

L. DEMPSTER

DEN315Y1 Oral Medicine and Pathology

The lectures cover diseases of the teeth, periodontium, tongue, oral mucosa, salivary glands, jaws, orofacial deformities and systemic diseases as they affect the mouth and jaws. The pathology, clinical aspects, differential diagnosis and management of these conditions are discussed. In the seminar sessions, a virtual microscopy-based teaching program is used to demonstrate the histological appearances of the most significant lesions, and to correlate histologic features with clinical presentation. The seminars are organized to impart a systematic approach to evaluate oral soft and hard tissue lesions, to formulate a diagnosis and treatment plan, to apply and consolidate what has been learned in the lectures.

G. BRADLEY, K. PERSCHBACHER, STAFF

DEN317Y1 Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology

Lectures, preclinical exercises and clinical rotations introduce the student to patient-centered intra-oral and panoramic imaging techniques, and radiographic interpretation of normal anatomy and common diseases affecting the teeth and jaws.

R. BARLOW, E. LAM, STAFF

DEN318Y1 Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

The third year Oral Surgery course consists of a didactic component a laboratory component and clinical work in the clinic. 

The didactic component is made up of a series of lectures presented in four modules. They are: Principles of Surgery, Principles of Exodontia,  Preprosthetic Surgery/Implantology and Infections of the Oral and Maxillofacial area. This didactic component aims at giving the students the knowledge related to the principles of Surgery in general, the instrumentation used, the surgical techniques of exodontia for both erupted and unerupted teeth and minor dentoalveolar surgery, the pre-prosthetic surgical procedures, and the management of infections. 

The laboratory component is designed to give the students a more realistic feeling of the use of instruments and the handling of tissues and it consists of two exercises held during January. The first exercise presents the technical details of simple exodontia and the instruments used. The students will work in groups on performing extractions on the surgical simulator. During the second exercise the students have a hands-on experience on raising flaps, suturing, performing a surgical extraction and doing a biopsy procedure on pig mandibles. The clinical work on patients in the Oral Surgery clinic starts in late spring. The students are divided in groups and perform clinical work on patients under the supervision of the clinical instructors. 

N. KATSIKERIS, STAFF

DEN322Y1 Orthodontics

The Third Year orthodontic course continues to build on concepts taught in the second year course. It consists of lectures designed to provide the student with a greater knowledge and understanding of the principles of orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning as well as introduce the student to other aspects of orthodontics such as the biology of tooth movement, orthodontic appliances and the role of orthodontics in multi-disciplinary treatment.

In the clinical component of the course students will perform complete orthodontic examinations on potential patients for the Graduate Orthodontic Clinic, in addition they will have instruction and hands on experience in clinical photography for the orthodontic patient. Students will also have hands on experience of orthodontic treatment with a simulated typodont.

K. SHARMA, STAFF

DEN365Y1 Orthodontics

In this course students will have the opportunity to put into practice knowledge gained from previous didactic courses in orthodontics. Screening sessions will allow students to develop their skills in examination and diagnosis for orthodontic patients. Case Based learning seminars are designed to foster a more in depth discussion of orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Students will also have a simulated orthodontic case and will go through all the steps involved with the treatment of a fully bonded orthodontic patient.  In addition students will have instruction and hands on experience in clinical photography for the orthodontic patient.

K. SHARMA, STAFF

DEN323Y1/DEN368Y1 Pediatric Dentistry

A series of lectures and seminars are presented on dentistry for children that include behavior management, infant care, diagnosis and treatment planning, management of early childhood caries, space management, pediatric dental emergencies and trauma, pediatric oral surgery and oral pathology, and applied pediatric medicine. The intent of the course is to provide the student with the knowledge and skills required to provide basic dental care to children in a family practice setting.

The clinical phase of Pediatric Dentistry is developed in a comprehensive manner during third year, stressing total patient care in the Children’s Clinic. The students also rotate to the City of Toronto Public Dental Health Clinic, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, and the Mt. Sinai Hospital for a portion of their clinical training. Students are required to attend all sessions to advance into 4th year, but a grade will only be given in Clinical Pedo at the end of 4th year.

P. ANDREWS, H. NAINAR, J. RUKAVINA, STAFF

DEN32H1/DEN371Y1 Periodontics

The main objective of third year Periodontics is to present a more detailed program on diagnosis, rationale, and delivery of periodontal therapy for a wide range of periodontal conditions, building on the basic knowledge and instrumentation skills learned in the first two years. The program consists of didactic, preclinical, and clinical elements. The didactic program consists of a series of lectures and seminars on periodontal therapy, including surgical therapies. These are integrated with preclinical sessions. Care of clinical patients is continued within a framework of clinical sessions under close supervision. At the completion of the year, students should possess the knowledge, motivation and clinical acuity to diagnose most periodontal conditions and to establish treatment plans for uncomplicated cases. They should have the knowledge needed to treat mild to moderate forms of periodontal diseases by combining sanative, antimicrobial and surgical modes of therapy and should be ready to enter an educational phase in which they can readily integrate their knowledge and skill in Periodontics with that learned in other programs. In addition, each student has assignments to assist in the Graduate Periodontics Clinic.

J. LAI, R. GHILZON, STAFF

DEN327H1 Pharmacology

The objective of this course is to provide applied knowledge of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics in dental practice. The topics covered include analgesics, dependency, anti-infectives, drugs used in medical emergencies and natural products. As well, the use of drugs for specific patient situations such as in the elderly, pregnancy and lactation, cardiovascular disease, and the immunocompromised, is also included.

D. HAAS, A. OUANOUNOU, STAFF

DEN333Y1/DEN377Y1 Prosthodontics

This course consists of both a didactic and a clinical component throughout 3rd year. The lectures focus on planning and integrating removable and fixed prosthodontic interventions within a continuum of comprehensive patient care. Prosthodontic treatment planning principles are underscored in lectures, winter term treatment planning seminars as well as, in patient assignments in the clinics. The clinical assignments form a part of the clinical comprehensive program that is undertaken throughout the year. The clinical instructors will ensure that the knowledge acquired in the first 3 years of studying is toward evidence-based decision making regarding prosthodontic management of patients with partial and completely edentulous jaws.

B. LEUNG, G. ANDERSON, STAFF

DEN336Y1/DEN380Y1 Restorative Dentistry

The clinical course takes place within the Comprehensive Care Program. The Fall Term provides close supervision for the transition from preclinical operative to clinical implementation of basic direct restorative procedures. The fundamental principles and methods for restoring teeth to structural, functional and esthetic acceptability, learned thus far in a preclinical setting, are emphasized as the students acquire the clinical skills necessary to treat individual patients. Patient management skills and student confidence in restorative dentistry are developed during this program. Students are evaluated on a daily basis using self-assessment and/or instructor assessment, and work towards achieving clinical competency which is evaluated in the form of (a) competency test (s). Lectures are designed to highlight clinical aspects of restorative materials and procedures. The final written examination comprehensively covers all material taught over the three years including lectures, reading assignments and the knowledge gained from clinical practice.

L. TAM, STAFF

DEN349H1 Ethics, Professionalism, Law II

Ethics is critical to being a professional and a working knowledge of the legislation that impacts on practicing dentists is important. To assist students in their understanding of this important topic, an online self-study course was developed by the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario in conjunction with the Faculty of Dentistry.

The course is made up of four (4) modules comprising the reading of selected articles / other publications / papers which will either be posted online or their link provided and the consideration of a number of ethical, legal and professional considerations for each module.

Students are divided into small groups and work through the various modules and complete the case study assignment for each under the guidance of a group facilitator and in conjunction with input and on-line interaction with their small discussion group.

I. FEFERGRAD, STAFF

DEN350Y1 ‚Äď Comprehensive Care Program III - Introduction to Treatment Planning and Total Patient Care

This multidisciplinary clinical program begins in the Fall Term of third year to provide a ‚Äútotal patient care experience‚ÄĚ from initial patient presentation to treatment completion for the majority of assigned patients. The third year portion of the clinical Comprehensive Care Program (CCP) introduces the student to multidisciplinary treatment planning and the concept of appropriately phased patient care. Treatment Plan Coordinators in CCP3 assist and educate students in the assessment, diagnosis and sequencing of patient care through comprehensive treatment planning sessions designed to ensure case understanding, rational treatment decisions and an appropriate treatment plan. Significant emphasis is placed in CCP3 on Phase 1 treatment planning and the importance of optimal oral disease control and patient-specific prevention. Following the development of a treatment plan, the multidisciplinary treatment needs of the patient are carried out under the supervision and teaching of clinical instructors from the periodontology, prosthodontics and restorative programs.

L. TAM, STAFF

DEN356Y1 Oral Diagnosis and Oral Medicine

The course starts in the Second Year and continues through Third Year to teach students a system of diagnosis of dental and oral disease. Emphasis is placed on methods of history taking, examination, patient evaluation and management as well as treatment planning. This will include the evaluation and management of healthy patients as well as of those with a wide variety of co-existing medical disorders. Students will learn the impact of medical conditions on treatment planning and provision of dental care.

During the whole of Third Year, students will attend the Oral Diagnosis and Emergency Clinics in order to obtain practical experience in the evaluation and management of a large and varied group of patients. They will also learn how to request and evaluate medical information from their patient’s physicians or hospitals. In the Faculty Emergency Clinic, the students learn to diagnose and manage a wide range of dental emergencies. The clinical sessions provide practical application of the material covered in the lecture/seminar component of the course and prepare students for the more detailed treatment planning sessions involved in the provision of comprehensive care.

K. BURGESS, R. BLACK, STAFF

DEN374Y1 Preventive Dentistry

The didactic program concentrates on the practical aspects of incorporating preventive dentistry into private dental practice. The objective of this course is to significantly improve patient’s oral health through the development of disease control programs based on disease risk determinations. We will review preventive therapies for the geriatric and medically compromised patients.  The student utilizes preventive principles and techniques for assigned clinic patients. 

Seminar sessions are devoted to patient motivation and preventive treatment planning.   The winter term seminar is case based and focuses on how to individualize preventive treatment plans to meet the individual needs of the patient.

A. OUANOUNOU, STAFF

DEN409Y1 Practice Administration

This is an interactive learning series beginning in the fall of Third Year and continuing through winter and spring terms and through Fourth Year, and is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the management and administration of a dental practice. Guest lecturers discuss relevant topics such as financing, accounting, resumes, interview techniques, time management, partnerships, taxation and risk management so that students are well informed about factors to be considered when entering private practice.

J. POSLUNS, STAFF


Fourth Year

In the Fourth Year the student applies the basic knowledge and techniques already acquired, to gain further clinical experience and familiarity with more advanced treatment services. To prepare students for entry into the profession as general practitioners, emphasis is placed upon integration of the various programs and overall management of patient treatment. In addition to their work in the Faculty's Clinics, students participate in elective programs, clinical conferences and hospital-based experiences.

Clinical Practice

See Third Year description.

DEN400H1 Anaesthesia

This course consists of seminars and clinical experience in anaesthesia as it applies to dentistry. The seminars review the protocol and applied aspects of handling medical emergencies. Students practice oxygen administration, intramuscular injection and venipuncture techniques on each other. The clinical component is carried out throughout the academic year and involves writing anaesthesia consultations for their patients, administering nitrous oxide:oxygen conscious sedation and taking a competency test for the latter.This is a credit/non-credit course.

H. KESTENBERG, STAFF

DEN409Y1 Practice Administration

This is an interactive learning series beginning in the fall of Third Year and continuing through winter and spring terms and through Fourth Year, and is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the management and administration of a dental practice. Guest lecturers discuss relevant topics such as financing, accounting, resumes, interview techniques, time management, partnerships, taxation and risk management so that students are well informed about factors to be considered when entering private practice.

J. POSLUNS, STAFF

DEN410H1 Orofacial Pain:  Mechanisms, Diagnosis and Management

The objective this course is to integrate basic and clinical sciences related to orofacial pain, in order to improve awareness on pain differential diagnosis, etiologies, mechanisms, and management.

Education about pain is complex, because of its multidimensional nature, its association with emotional,

psychological and social disorders, and impact on the patient’s well-being and quality of life. The course is designed to offer students insight into these intricate aspects of pain.

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to appreciate the socioeconomic burden of acute and chronic pain, in addition to their effects on the patient’s quality of life. Emphasis will be put on the importance of understanding peripheral and central pain mechanisms, toward differential diagnosis of various orofacial pain conditions, and evidence-based treatment decisions that range from physiotherapy to pharmacological approaches. The contribution of genetics and the immune system, gender and behavioral issues to pain will also be discussed. Students will also learn about movement disorders that may be associated with pain, bruxism being the most commonly identified in dentistry.

P. CHERKAS, STAFF

DEN411Y1 Clinical Application of Practice Administration

This course puts into practice the concepts and topics discussed in Practice Administration (DEN409Y) while managing patients. Students must prepare for and attend all regularly scheduled chart audits. Students must also successfully complete the final chart audit to be awarded a credit for this course.

J. POSLUNS

DEN449H1 Ethics, Professionalism, Law III

Ethics is critical to being a professional and a working knowledge of the legislation that impacts on practicing dentists is important. To assist students in their understanding of this important topic, this course is to reinforce ethical principles discussed in modules 1-4 of DEN249H1 and modules 5-8 of DEN349H1. Concepts are reviewed and further developed at a higher level in the context of application to daily practice.

I. FEFERGRAD, STAFF

DEN450Y1/DEN451Y1 Comprehensive Care Program

This multidisciplinary clinical program begins in May of third year and continues throughout fourth year in order to provide continuing care for all assigned patients and to amplify the student experience in provision of optimal comprehensive care. Students participate in the assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning and provision or management of the treatment needs for all patients for whom they are designated primary providers. The process begins in the diagnostic clinics and continues in the comprehensive care clinic for the same student and patient wherever possible. The emphasis is on providing optimal patient care which addresses the oral health needs of the patient and takes into consideration the patient’s wishes. Emphasis is placed on provision of optimal disease control and prevention for all patients prior to more extensive rehabilitation. Major program goals are the completion of treatment for all assigned patients and adequate preparation of students for general practice.

Students are assigned to Clinical Comprehensive Care Teams each with designated Coordinators, specialist consultants and clinical instructors. Central to the program objectives is the development of a rational treatment plan for an informed patient. Treatment planning is carried out by Team Coordinators and the process ensures careful patient assessment and appropriate specialist consultations. The program emphasizes the educational development of treatment planning, critical thinking and decision-making skills. Patient-Based-Learning (PBL) didactic seminars are conducted in small student groups throughout the program, towards the same educational objectives and sharing the resource of CCP patients.

The Comprehensive Care Program culminates in case-based comprehensive didactic examinations for adult patients as well as a final oral review of the student’s portfolio. This reflective review covers the comprehensive care of the student’s assigned patients during CCP3 and CCP4. Conducted by teams of academic staff, the oral examination is the final assessment of the student’s overall achievement of obtaining the competency of a beginning dental practitioner.

D. CORNELL, STAFF

DEN453Y1 Endodontics

This course offers the student didactic and clinical components. The didactic component in the fall term is designed to introduce the student to advances in endodontic science and technologies. This course will adopt a problem-based learning approach for clinical case presentations by students in small groups. The clinical component expands the knowledge and an experience gained in the 3rd year, and provides the student opportunities to acquire the skills and experience in providing basic endodontic treatments in the context of comprehensive dental care.

P. CHERKAS, STAFF
 

DEN456Y1 Oral Diagnosis and Oral Medicine

Students continue to attend the Oral Diagnosis and Emergency Clinics for further experience in history taking, examination, patient evaluation and dental management of the medically compromised patient.  They will learn to interpret the findings from the patient’s chief complaint, medical, social, family and dental histories, as well clinical exam and other appropriate tests.  The students will request and evaluate medical information from their patient’s physicians or other health team members. 

K. BURGESS, STAFF

DEN459Y1 Oral Radiology

The 4th year course builds on the clinical and didactic Oral Radiology experiences from second and third years. Skills in radiographic techniques and radiologic interpretation continue to be developed through patient assignments and case reporting during radiology clinic assignments. An emphasis is made on appropriate prescription of radiographs, competent imaging technique and thorough reporting. Recognition of normal anatomy and variants is reinforced. A seminar on advanced radiologic interpretation provides the opportunity to practice radiologic diagnosis of lesions of the jaws.

S. PERSCHBACHER, STAFF

DEN462Y1 Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

The Fourth Year Oral Surgery course consists of a series of lectures in the advanced aspects of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery presented in four different modules; Management of Dentofacial Deformities, Oral and Maxillofacial Trauma, Surgical Management of Pathology and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders.   

The goal of this program is to provide the students with a basic understanding and the diagnostic capability to approach these more advanced aspects, of Oral Surgery which customarily are dealt with by Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. 

The clinical part of the course is the continuation of the clinical work started during the third year in the Oral Surgery clinic. During the fourth year a large number of clinical procedures will be performed in the clinic making this year essential in the development of the diagnostic, clinical, and differential diagnosis Oral Surgery skills for the students 

N. KATSIKERIS, STAFF

DEN465Y1 Orthodontics

The fourth year orthodontic program has both didactic and clinical components. In the didactic part, a series of lectures are given to strengthen students’ diagnostic abilities and broaden their perspective in incorporating orthodontic treatment in multidisciplinary treatments. The aim of the didactic part is to provide students a better understanding of basic application of orthodontics in daily practice and advanced orthodontic treatment planning in more complex cases. In the clinical part, students are exposed to initial orthodontic screening of prospective patients for graduate orthodontic clinic, fabricate and adjust removable orthodontic appliances, and academic discussions to evaluate treatment outcome of orthodontic treatment for a wide range of malocclusions. Student performance is monitored through one term test at the end of fall semester, one oral exam at the end of academic year and daily clinical performance throughout the year.

E. ARAT, STAFF

DEN468Y1 Pediatric Dentistry

Additional emphasis in clinical Pediatric Dentistry is given and advanced treatments during the primary, mixed and permanent dentition periods, including management of dental abnormalities and injuries to teeth, are emphasized both in the Faculty clinic and a Community Dental Clinic in Toronto. Students are encouraged to treat children under conscious sedation and to see multiple patients in each of their sessions. In addition, students will have a required assignment to the Pediatric Dentistry Surgicentre. The dental care of persons with special needs is provided through affiliated hospitals. Various members of the department give seminars in advanced Pediatric Dentistry throughout the year. Elective programs in conjunction with the Hospital for Sick Children, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Moose Factory Dental Project and Weeneebayko General Hospital are available.

H. NAINAR, J. RUKAVINA, STAFF

DEN471Y1 Periodontics

The major objective of fourth year Periodontics is to graduate general practitioners who possess the knowledge, judgement, skill and motivation to serve individual patients and the community's needs in the recognition, treatment and prevention of periodontal diseases. In the Comprehensive Care clinics in fourth year, emphasis is placed on integrating periodontal diagnosis and treatment within the overall oral health care of patients.  Students are challenged to learn how Periodontics influences the management of both uncomplicated and complex cases. Discrimination between cases treatable in general practice and those which should be treated through co-operation between generalist and specialist, is stressed. 

R. GHILZON, STAFF

DEN474Y1 Preventive Dentistry

There are no formal lectures or seminars in this course, as it is independent and self-directed. Cases are presented where individuals at high risk of dental disease have been identified and preventive care has been individualized for such patients. Cases, which present other challenging preventive problems, are also presented and discussed. A clinical assignment requires that students evaluate the risk of dental disease in selected clinic patients and provide an appropriate level of preventive care for each.   

A. OUANOUNOU, STAFF

DEN477Y1 Prosthodontics

This course consists of a lecture series in the fall term and assignments in the clinic in the fall and spring terms. The objective of the didactic course is to create congruity between the understanding of the sequelea of partial and complete edentulism and evidence based decision making regarding prosthodontic management.

B. LEUNG, G. ANDERSON, STAFF

DEN480Y1 Restorative Dentistry

The program consists of the restorative clinical care of Comprehensive Care Program patients. The aim is to broaden the student's clinical experience and to further develop and refine his/her operative skills and diagnostic acumen. More advanced treatments are carried out and alternative forms of treatment are discussed. Emphasis is also placed on integration of restorative care with the other clinical programs. Minimum treatment requirements are established to ensure adequate clinical experience has been provided followed by clinical competency testing.

Lectures amplify and broaden the students' didactic knowledge with emphasis on recent developments in Restorative materials and techniques.

O. EL-MOWAFY, W. EL-BADWARY, STAFF

DEN490Y1 Community Based Service Learning

The role of the dental provider extends beyond the traditional dental office. Populations exist that are unable to access oral health care through conventional methods of treatment. These populations   continue to increase in number, leading to concerns regarding access to care to a growing number of Canadians. In order to serve these populations and to expose students to the importance of delivery care in a variety of non-traditional venues, this course encompasses a number of off-site clinical rotations.

Students must be exposed to the role of the profession in delivering care to marginalized populations. In order to provide this exposure, students in their final dental year spend a day in University of Toronto affiliated clinics and community based sites.

J. POSLUNS, STAFF

DEN491Y1 Dental Outreach Community Services

Community Health is the study of the health of populations in a community context. The purpose of this course is to educate dental students on how dentistry can contribute in improving health and achieving equity in health for all people in the community. This clinical course identifies and organizes a number of off-site rotations in Ontario in need of access to dental care, providing students with a varied educational experience in dealing with the challenges of delivering care to those in need. Students will be scheduled in limited numbers to visit the identified clinics to provide dental care, and to experience actual oral health challenges alongside a team of local dental care providers and community members, as part of a community-based outreach initiative to promote oral health prevention and treatment. Rotation are expected to be 1-2 days. Students are supervised by an affiliated instructor of the Faculty, and each student will be required to present their findings and self-reflections about their community health experiences.

Application for this course is required and only appropriate students will be selected. Enrollment is limited.

A.AZARPAZHOOH, STAFF

DEN492Y1 Dental Outreach Global Services

Global Health is the study of health of populations in a global context, and focuses on transnational health issues, determinants, and solutions. Global health involves many disciplines within and beyond the health sciences and promotes interdisciplinary collaboration, and is a combination of population based prevention with individual-level clinical care.  The purpose of this course is to educate dental students on how dentistry can contribute in improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide. Students will become familiar with the public health, demographic, socio-economic, cultural, health disparity and logistical issues of a particular country. Students will visit the country to experience actual oral health challenges alongside a team of highly trained Canadian and American dentists, as well as local dental care providers and community members. Each student will be required to present their findings and self-reflections about their global health experiences.

Application for this course is required and only appropriate students will be selected. Enrollment is limited.

A. AZARPAZHOOH, STAFF